Professional Paper

Agricultural Extension Education

 

 

 

AN ORGANIC PRODUCERS’ RESOURCE GUIDE

TO THE

FOUR CORNERS STATES

 

 

 

Submitted by

Katy Pepinsky

College of Agricultural Sciences

 

 

 

 

In partial fulfillment of the requirements

For the Degree of Master of Agriculture

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado

Fall 2005

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

CONTENTS

ABSTRACT...……………………………………………………………………………iv

CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………..1

CHAPTER 2 – NATIONAL ORGANIC RESOURCES…………………………………2

Reasons to Become a Certified Organic Producer..………………………………2

How to Get Started in, or Transition to, Organic Production…………………......2

USDA Resources………...….…………………………………………………….5

Accredited Independent Organic Certifiers………………………….……………6

Independent Organic Inspectors Association (IOIA)…………………..…………8

ATTRA Resources………………………………………………………………...8

Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF)………………………………......9

Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI)..…………………………………...10

Analytical Resources…………………………………………………………….10

Resources and Testimonials from Farmers and Ranchers in the SWMN………..11

CHAPTER 3 – FOUR CORNERS STATES ORGANIC RESOURCES

Arizona………………………………………………………………………..….18

State Organic Producer Organizations……………………………..…….18

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers……………………………………18

Analytical Laboratories…………………………………………………..19

Marketing Services..……………………………………………………..21

Educational and Research Services..……….……………………………23

Organic Businesses………………………………………………………24

Publications………….………….………………………………………..24

University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and

Marketing of Organic Products………………………..…28

Colorado...……………………………………………………………………….33

State Organic Producer Organizations…………………………………...33

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers……………………………………34

Analytical Laboratories…………………………………………………..35

Marketing Services………………………………………………………37

Educational and Research Services…….………………………………..41

Organic Businesses………………………………………………………45

Publications………….…………………………………………………...48

University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and

Marketing of Organic Products………………………..…51

New Mexico.……………………………………………………………………...57

State Organic Producer Organizations…………………………………...57

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers……….…………………………...57

Analytical Laboratories…………………………………………………..58

Marketing Services………………………………………………………60

Educational and Research Services….…………………………………..63

Organic Businesses………………………………………………………67

Publications………….……………………………………….…………..68

University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and

Marketing of Organic Products………………………..…70

Utah……………………………………………………………………………....74

State Organic Producer Organizations…………………………………...74

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers………….………………………...74

Analytical Laboratories…………………………………………………..75

Marketing Services………………………………………………………77

Education and Research Services………………………………………..77

Organic Businesses………………………………………………………79

Publications………….…………………………………….……………..79

University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and

Marketing of Organic Products………………………..…82

BIBLIOGRAPHY………………………………………………………………………..85

 

 


 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT

 

The organic movement in the United States began to define itself and gain national attention from constituents in the 1970’s (Kimbrell, 2002). Also at this time researchers at many of the Land Grant Universities began to take interest in the successes achieved by producers who adopted organic agricultural methods (Kimbrell, 2002). In 1992 the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) established the National Organic Program (NOP) which, through a series of guidelines, laid the framework for a national organic standard. Recognizing organic farming as the fastest growing sector of US agriculture, many state and local organizations, including universities, formed programs to provide organic farmers with technical, social, political, and economic assistance (Kimbrell, 2002).

The Southwest Marketing Network (SWMN) is an example of a regional organization striving to address the needs of organic producers in the Four Corners states. In order to further their outreach support and encourage the development of lasting connections between people and organizations involved in organic production and marketing in the Southwest, the SWMN has funded the development of an Organic Producers Resource Guide for the Four Corners states.

Organic resource guides have been published in several states. Within the past five years Oregon State University, The California Certified Organic Farmers Association, and Washington State University have created resource guides for organic agriculturalists in their region. Resource guides are one way to provide assistance to farmers who are interested in producing organic crops and to address requests for information on organic farming (Taylor, 1999). In addition, they provide a way in which to organize scattered information and resources that can be frustrating for farmers, producer advocates, and researchers to access otherwise (Taylor, 1999). By creating an effective, user friendly, and attractive guide that improves the dissemination of important information, these groups have encouraged the development and success of organic agricultural production in their states.

Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah currently have no published organic resource guides that pertain to their specific area. The information gathered through this project has created a resource guide that addresses the specific technical, social, political, and economic needs of emerging organic farmers in the Four Corners states.

 

 


 

 

 

CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION

 

The Southwest Marketing Network (SWMN) works with farmers, ranchers, food and fiber processors, and agricultural organizations in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. Its goals are to ensure that new, existing, and prospective Southwest agricultural producers, especially small-scale, alternative, and minority producers, connect to others by having access to risk management tools, business and marketing strategies, technical and financial assistance, crop insurance information and assistance, and peer examples needed to improve their marketing success.

This guide was inspired by requests from farmers, ranchers, and service organizations in the SWMN for a listing of the organic resources in their region. It is designed to help provide organic producers, and those interested in transitioning to organic agriculture, with contacts and other resources relative to organic production in each of the Four Corner States.

Designing this guide was a challenge. There are many resources available in the region that, although they do not specifically speak to organic production, are pertinent to small-scale, alternative, and minority producers, many of which are using organic practices, but are without USDA organic certification. Being an organic producer, handler, processor, or distributor requires adopting a new language and a new network in which to operate. It is the goal of this guide to introduce some of that language, the organizations that work within the sector, and the people who are available to answer questions, perform research, and are the leaders in the organic movement in the Four Corners states.

 

 


 

 

 

CHAPTER 2 – NATIONAL ORGANIC RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

Reasons to become a Certified Organic Producer:

Adapted from: Transitioning to Organic Production

Published by: The Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN), the national outreach arm of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, with funding from USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. http://www.sare.org/publications/organic/index.htm

 

 

Organic farming is an environmentally responsible practice that:

 

1) Replenishes cultivated land with organic matter,

2) Over time improves natural soil health and fertility,

3) Promotes and enhances soil, plant, and insect biodiversity,

4) Encourages a high standard of personal health and quality-of-life,

5) Uses minimal off-farm inputs and management practices that restore, maintain, and enhance ecological harmony (National Organic Standards Board, 1996),

6) Balances the natural ecology of an agricultural system,

7) Produces high quality agricultural products,

8) Can be equally productive with conventional systems,

9) Captures a high cost for its products, and

10) Has become nationally recognized by the United States Department of Agriculture with defined quality standards.

 

 


 

How to get started in, or transition to, organic production:

Adapted from: Transitioning to Organic Production

Published by: The Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN), the national outreach arm of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, with funding from USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service. http://www.sare.org/publications/organic/index.htm

 

 

CONVERTING TO ORGANIC PRODUCTION IS NOT A DECISION to take lightly. Organic farmers must learn how to work with nature to solve problems, such as adapting crop rotations to improve soil fertility, manage weeds and control pests rather than simply substituting accepted materials for prohibited ones. Farmers considering a transition to organic farming should think about the following questions, drafted by the Ohio Ecological Food and Farming Association (OEFFA):

1) Do you enjoy walking your fields on a regular basis?
2) Can you distinguish pests from beneficial insects?
3) Are you curious about why things happen on your farm?
4) Can you tolerate a field that is not weed free?
5) Do you have the patience to trade short-term economic returns for longer-term “ecological” credits while building soil health?

Farmers converting to organic purely to improve profits often fail because they do not consider the huge range of economic, social and production changes that must occur. The transition period can be particularly stressful because of the need to develop and implement new management skills. In fact, you must be prepared to survive a short-term financial loss if yields drop and costs increase during this period. Other considerations, posed by OEFFA and others, include:

6) How will the transition period, where yields sometimes decrease and price premiums are not yet available, impact your family?
7) How will potential social stigma and negative peer pressure from other farmers impact you?
8) What resources are available? Consider labor, borrowing capability, knowledge base of local extension and information exchange regarding organic production.
9) How will you develop the new types of relationships required to market organic products?

Some farmers view the transition period as an investment in education. During this time, when some growers experience declining profits, remember you are not only learning new skills but also are building what some economists call “natural resource capital”. This refers to:

10) Improved physical characteristics of soil and plants, such as better soil water infiltration, increased microbial populations, more natural predators, and better control of weeds.

Like investing in a new stock, there may not be short-term profits, but in the long run, you are setting the stage for the sustainability of your land and farm.

 

START-UP IDEAS AFTER DECIDING TO TAKE THE PLUNGE INTO ORGANIC PRODUCTION:

Consider the following strategies:

1) Identify the closest certification organization and start collecting information about how to come into compliance.
2) Make contacts.
3) Attend meetings of organic and other transitional farmers.
4) Collect books and other resources and find extension agents and other educators who are knowledgeable about organic production and transition strategies.
5) Experiment with a systems approach that will work on your farm or ranch.
6) Focus on prevention strategies and treating the causes of problems rather than specific problems themselves.
7) Develop marketing strategies for your organic products.
8) In the planning phase, evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the farm. How will you work with the natural system you have? Are you ready for a transition? For example: What are your most valuable natural resources? Does topography work for or against you? What kind of pest pressure do you experience? How healthy are the soils? (Adapted from ‘The Transition Process’ by the Rodale Institute.)
9) Soil health is extremely important because you will no longer rely on external inputs, but depend instead on the activity and capacity of the soil.
10) Think about pest control. Biological pest control is complex, involving complicated interactions among crop rotations, intercropping combinations, planting schedules and beneficial habitats.
11) What strategies or systems are already in place?

 

HOW TO GET CERTIFIED:

USDA accredits state, private and foreign organizations to become “certifying agents.” Those agents certify that a farmer’s production and handling practices meet the national standards. To initiate the process of certification, the following information must be submitted to an accredited certifying agent:

1) Type of operation.
2) History of substances applied to land for the previous three years.
3) Organic products being grown, raised, or processed.
4) An organic plan, which includes practices and substances used in production. This plan should also detail any monitoring practices that will be used to verify that the production system will be organic, including the record-keeping system, and how to prevent co-mingling of organic and non-organic products and contact of products with prohibited substances.
5) You will also need to evaluate and prepare a description of the physical barriers and buffers on your property that separate your operation from conventional neighbors.
6) After reviewing the application, if the certifying agent determines you are eligible, a qualified inspector will schedule a visit for an on-site inspection.
7) If the application and inspection report show compliance with the requirements, certification will be granted.
8) Once certified, you must re-apply for certification every year, and will also be assessed a certification fee of a few hundred dollars each year. Many states currently have cost share programs to offset certification fees. (Contact your local certifier for more information.)

 

 

 

 


 

USDA Resources:

 

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Organic Program (NOP)

The National Organic Program (NOP) regulations require that agricultural products labeled as organic originate from farms or handling operations certified by a State or private entity that has been accredited by USDA. This site includes regulatory texts, list of approved materials, lists of accredited certifiers, as well as background and consumer information.

Contact Information:

http://www.ams.usda.gov/nop/indexNet.htm

Phone: (202) 720-3252

 

USDA Economic Assistance for Organic and Transitioning Farmers

Some federal programs provide financial assistance to organic farmers and ranchers and those transitioning to organic systems. Please check details with each program to verify their current status and to obtain additional information.

1) Conservation Security Program (USDA-NRCS)

Provides technical and annual financial assistance to farmers and ranchers to reward new and ongoing good stewardship practices that enhance natural resources and the environment. Organic producers adopting or maintaining whole farm conservation plans will likely qualify for CSP support.

www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/csp/

2) Organic Certification Cost Share, National Organic Program (USDA-AMS)

Offers organic producers and handlers financial assistance to offset the costs of certification under the National Organic Program. Each operation is eligible for up to 75 percent of its cost of certification, not to exceed $500. This program is administered by individual state Departments of Agriculture.

www.ams.usda.gov/nop/StatePrograms/CostShare.html

3) Organic Transition Payments Agricultural Management Assistance (USDA-NRCS)

In the 12 northeastern states, plus WY, UT, and NV, provides conservation financial and technical assistance to farmers making the transition to organic. www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/ama/

4) Environmental Quality Incentives Program (USDA-NRCS)

Provides technical and one-time financial assistance to farmers and ranchers for management conservation practices. Some NRCS state offices have developed specific organic cropping or livestock conservation options under EQIP.

www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/eqip/

5) Value-Added Agricultural Producer Grants (USDA-RBCS)

Organic foods qualify as value-added agricultural products eligible for grant funds through the VAPG program. Individual producers, producer groups, or producer-owned cooperatives or business ventures can apply to develop business plans or feasibility studies or to develop a new marketing or processing venture that will improve farm income and competitiveness. www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/coops/vadg.htm

 

Western Region Sustainable Agriculture & Research Education (SARE)

SARE is a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that functions through competitive grants conducted cooperatively by farmers, ranchers, researchers and agricultural professionals to advance farm and ranch systems that are profitable, environmentally sound and good for communities.

∞ The Western SARE puts out a call to area sustainable and organic producers to submit grant proposals each year. They also provide information and answer questions relative to sustainable and organic agriculture.

∞ Each state in the western region has a SARE coordinator.

Contact Information:

Robert Newhall

Plants, Soils & Biometerology Department

UMC 4820

Logan, UT 84322-4820

Phone: (435) 797-2183

Fax: (435) 797-2117

E-mail: bobn@ext.usu.edu

Website: http://wsare.usu.edu

 

 


 

Accredited Independent Organic Certifiers:

 

The following are accredited organizations, other than the USDA, that have completed the organic certification of farms in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah. By no means is this a complete list. Costs differ by organization. See The Organic Farming Research Foundation for a complete, nation-wide list of accredited certifiers, ‘National Certifiers Directory’: www.ofrf.org .

 

1) Quality Assurance International – QAI

QAI offers organic certification under the National Organic Program for Producers, Processors, Private Labelers, Distributors, Retailers, Restaurants, Wild Crop Harvesters, Greenhouse, Mushrooms, and Facilities. QAI also offers 'Source Certification for Bottled Water Products' under Codex Alimentarius standards, and 'Fiber Certification' under the American Organic Standards. For answers to general questions on organic certification, contact:

Contact Information:

Ellen Holton

9191 Towne Centre Drive, Suite 510

San Diego, CA 92122

Phone: (858) 792-3531, or 792-3531

Fax: (858) 792-8665

E-mail: qai@qai-inc.com

 

2) Oregon Tilth

Oregon Tilth is a nonprofit research and education membership organization dedicated to biologically sound and socially equitable agriculture. Tilth's history begins in 1974, as an agricultural organization with a unique urban-rural outlook. Primarily an organization of organic farmers, gardeners and consumers, Tilth offers educational events throughout the state of Oregon, and provides organic certification services to organic growers, processors, and handlers internationally.

Contact Information:

Oregon Tilth

470 Lancaster Dr. NE

Salem, Oregon 97301

Phone: (503) 378-0690

Fax: (503) 378-0809

E-mail: organic@tilth.org

Website: www.tilth.org

 

3) Certified Naturally Grown

Certified Naturally Grown is a non-profit alternative eco-labeling program for small farms that grow using USDA Organic methods but are NOT a part of the USDA Certified Organic program. They certify farms primarily distributing locally and directly, through Farmer's Markets, Farm Stands, Community Supported Agriculture projects, to local restaurants, coops, small grocery stores or through other direct sales channels such as the Internet.

Contact Information:

Certified Naturally Grown

205 Huguenot Street

New Paltz, NY 12561

Phone: (845) 256-0686

E-mail: info@naturallygrown.org

Website: www.naturallygrown.org

 

4) Organic Crop Improvement Association (OCIA)

OCIA International is a member-owned nonprofit organization that provides research, education, and certification services to thousands of organic growers, processors and handlers in North, Central and South America, Africa, Europe and the Pacific Rim.

Contact Information:

OCIA International

6400 Cornhusker, Suite 125

Lincoln, NE 68507

Phone: (402) 477-2323

Fax: (402) 477-4325

E-mail: info@ocia.org

Website: www.ocia.org

 

 


 

Independent Organic Inspectors Association – IOIA:

IOIA is an association of organic inspectors which strives to provide support services for inspectors and an opportunity for a collective voice in organic industry issues. IOIA has no alliance to any particular certification agency, however they work closely with many certification agencies to develop policies relating to organic inspection and inspector training.

∞ All certifiers are invited to attend IOIA trainings and present their programs: www.ioia.net/trainreq.htm#top

Contact Information:

Independent Organic Inspectors Association PO Box 6 Broadus, MT 59317 Phone: (406) 436-2031

Website: www.ioia.net

 

 


 

National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (ATTRA) Resources:

 

ATTRA, the National Sustainable Agricultural Information Service operated by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT), is an excellent source of information (including templates) for growers interested in organic certification and/or beginning a transition to organic production.

Useful publications from ATTRA include:

 

1) Organic Farm Certification and the National Organic Program – a brief overview of certification,
2) An Overview of Organic Crop Production – describes the key concepts and practices of certified crop production,
3) Creating an Organic Production and Handling System Plan – a template for creating the mandatory organic system plan,
4) Organic Field Crops Documentation Forms – a set of worksheets that farmers can use for documenting activities, practices and inputs to demonstrate compliance with the organic regulations,
5) Compliance Checklist for Producers – a checklist designed to assist growers with assessing compliance of a farm or ranch with the National Organic Program Standards,
6) A list of Suppliers of Seed for Certified Organic Production.
7) …ATTRA also publishes a series of booklets on organic production for fruits, vegetables, flowers, herbs, livestock, field crops, as well as manuals on organic control of pests, soil and fertilizer issues and marketing and certification.

 

ATTRA publications are available for free to farmers.

Contact Information:

Phone: 1-800-346-9140

http://www.attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/organcert.html

 

 


 

Organic Farming Research Foundation - OFRF:

OFRF is a non-profit whose mission is to sponsor research related to organic farming practices, to disseminate research results to organic farmers and to growers interested in adopting organic production systems, and to educate the public and decision-makers about organic farming issues.

Contact Information:

P.O. Box 440

Santa Cruz, CA 95061

Phone: 831-426-6606

Fax: 831-426-6670

Website: www.ofrf.org

Regional Contact:

Steve Ela, Board President

30753 L Road

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-3488

E-mail: info@elafamilyfarms.com

 

 

 

 


 

Organic Materials Review Institute - OMRI:

The OMRI specializes in the review of substances for use in organic production, processing, and handling. Their services are directed to all aspects of the organic industry with a primary focus on the decision makers who deal with the compliance status of generic materials and brand name products for use in organic production under USDA’s standards.

∞ They publish an organic seed, brand name, and product list – all of which are certified to be used under USDA’s organic standards.

∞ For specific organic compliance issues first contact your state organic certifier.

Contact Information:

PO Box 11558 Eugene, OR 97440 Phone: (541) 343-7600 Fax: (541) 343-8971 E-mail: info@omri.org

Website: www.omri.org

 

 


 

Analytical Resources:

The following labs specialize in soil, plant, and water testing that address organic production needs. They each accept requests for testing from all over the world.

 

 

Albion Labs

Performs complete analyses of plant tissue, soil, and irrigation water. For a description of how to package and send a soil sample see:

http://www.albion-an.com/plant/archivetopic.htm , article titled: ‘Managing Soils to Optimize Crop Production’.

Contact Information:

Kevin Dickinson

Albion Advanced Nutrition

101 North Main St.

Clearfield, UT 84015

Phone, Toll-free: (866) 243-5283

E-mail: kdickinson@albion-an.com

Website: www.albion-an.com

 

Cascade Analytical

Completes agricultural analyses in the following areas: Garden Testing , Fruit Maturity , Soil Fertility , Irrigation Water , Plant Nutrition , Pesticide Analysis , and Fruit Mineral s.

Contact Information:

Cascade Analytical Inc.

3019 G.S. Center Road

Wenatchee, WA 98801

Phone: (509) 662-1888, or Toll-free: (800) 545-4206

Fax: (509) 662-8183

E-mail: cascade@nwi.net

Website: www.cascadeanalytical.com

 

The Soil Foodweb

Measures the quality and quantity of soil organisms and guide you to build the life in your soil to grow healthier plants. They complete analyses of soil, compost, compost tea, leaf assays, and assays. Sample submission forms can be found on their website.

Contact Information:

Lab

Soil Foodweb, Inc.

728 SW Wake Robin Avenue

Corvallis, OR 97333

Phone:

SFI Consultant Phone Line, Rate $25 per 1/4 hour: (888) 224-9919

Samples and Reports questions: (541) 752-5066

Fax: (541) 752-5142

E-mail: info@soilfoodweb.com

Website: http://www.soilfoodweb.com/01_services/01_oregon/index.html

 


 

Resources and Testimonials from Farmers and Ranchers in the SWMN:

 

The following are profiles of three growers in the Four Corner States who have had successful experiences in transitioning to and utilizing organic practices. They are included in the guide in order to help people interested in transitioning to organic assess the potential for organic production methods in their own operation.

 

 

PROFILE

1. UTAH ORGANIC GRAIN PRODUCER BUILDS ON LAST GENERATION’S SUCCESSES

Adapted from: An Introduction to Organic Farming

Published by: The Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN), the national outreach arm of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program, with funding from USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

www.sare.org/bulletin/organic

 

Utah farmer Lydia Poulsen sells about 90 percent of her organic grain to area livestock producers. When she transitioned between 1992 and 1994, she found a ready market, but advises other farmers to thoroughly research their sales options.

 

WHEN LYDIA POULSEN WAS A SMALL CHILD, SHE RECALLS THAT the ground on her parents’ Utah farm “would set up like cement. We had areas that we called ‘alkali slicks’ where, because of the high pH, nothing would grow.” After Poulsen converted 800 acres of small grains and hay and 3,000 acres of pasture to organic production in 1989, the alkali slicks all but disappeared. And now, following rainstorms, the soil no longer crusts. “There are a lot of positive things about organic farming,” she said, attributing the improvements in her soils to the elimination of chemical fertilizers.

 

While additions of organic matter clearly have improved her soil, Poulsen has been frustrated by fertility constraints in her organic operation, specifically in wheat. “It’s hard getting fertility into the ground and getting the microbial population up,” Poulsen said, referring to the prohibitive cost of transporting compost or manure to her land. Potential organic farmers, she adds, should calculate costs of manure or other amendments for their systems. Instead, Poulsen has tried winter peas and clover as nitrogen suppliers, but seed is very expensive. She also has experimented with gypsum and fish emulsion. But while she admits that wheat yields do suffer from less nitrogen - they tend to be half of what they are the first year following alfalfa - she hasn’t seen net profit drop.

 

Poulsen’s father also employed many environmentally sound methods in his production system, including techniques compatible with current organic practices. When he subdivided the farm, leaving 800 acres to Lydia, she merely adapted many of his successful practices. “My father recognized that sprays were limited in how long they would control the bugs in alfalfa,” Poulsen said,” and could see that there was a better, more complete way to go.” To control aphids, weevils and other insects, her father introduced ladybugs. Following in his footsteps, even before Poulsen switched to organic, she used “nola-bait” to control grasshoppers. After years of releasing ladybugs, along with lacewings and praying mantises,” the natural population is now established,” Poulsen said. Poulsen converted to organic after a large organic dairy in the area asked her to certify her grain. At that time, the transition period was only one year instead of the current three, and with a ready-made market, her transition was smooth.

 

For Poulsen, who farms with her husband, Dennis, near Snowville, Utah, the switch to organic production was not that hard because she was already rotating small grains, alfalfa and oat hay for her 130-head beef operation. About 10 percent of her grains stay on the farm for the cattle while she sells the rest off the farm.

 

For growers looking to transition to organic production today, Poulsen recommends that they research and secure a reliable market before beginning. While profit is important, it’s not the sole argument for farming organically. More than anything, Poulsen said,” Organic provides a way to educate people about agriculture. People are far more interested in why I farm organically than why I farm.”

 

 

PROFILE

2. SHARING COMMON-SENSE SOLUTIONS TO THE RANGELAND CONFLICT, MARK CORTNER

Adapted from: The Quivira Coalition, Volume 3, No. 3: May 2000, Profile of Good Stewardship: Mark Cortner

http://www.quiviracoalition.org/documents/profile11.html#co-op

 

To stay healthy, rancher Mark Cortner has decided to go organic.

 

Although he is referring to the economic health of his ranch, he will try an organic steak now and then (when he can afford it) for his own bodily well-being. “They taste better, too!” says Mark with a smile.

 

Mark and his ranch are in the early stages of becoming only the fourth supplier of certified organic beef in the whole state of New Mexico, and only the second to steward his animals from calf to carcass.

 

Mark’s motivation for going organic is simple: supply and demand. The supply of organic products has not matched the rapid expansion of demand. “The Nike corporation likes to use organic cotton in some of its shoes,” says Mark, by way of example, “but it can’t find enough farmers who grow the stuff, so they pay top dollar.”

 

Mark expects to earn top dollar for his beef. In fact, he anticipates clearing $800 net on every cow. That is many times higher than what most ranchers clear with a traditional beef operation. “The organic market is more stable, too,” says Mark. “It doesn’t fluctuate as much as conventional beef. I’ve looked into it.”

 

Indeed he has.

 

Plan

A visit to Mark’s ranch reveals a number of surprises. First is its size. He owns less than 2000 acres, most of it private, and runs only 20 head of cattle. He has owned the land for less than two years though, having owned ranches in Colorado and Texas previously.

 

The second surprise is the condition of the land, which might charitably be called a “management opportunity” (even progressive ranchers avoid the “o” word). Located in dry, scrubby country southwest of Roswell, New Mexico, the previous owners of the ranch were, in Mark’s words “not great managers” and left the place in poor shape.

 

The third surprise is Mark’s attitude. He sees the size and condition of his ranch as an opportunity for success, not a recipe for struggle. The key is diversifying the economics of the ranch. “I’m tired of making money one year and losing it the next,” says Mark, referring to the unpredictable beef market. “I figure there’s got to be a better way.”

 

So, Mark came up with a plan. The short-term strategy includes the small herd of registered European Mouflon sheep, which Mark raises behind his house. These pure-bred sheep are fairly rare and quite valuable as breeding stock. (The family also banks on the steady salary of Mark’s wife, who is a teacher.)

 

The long-term plan includes restoring the ranch’s rangeland to health, building up the wildlife population, allowing a few hunters on the ranch, converting one of the houses to a Bed and Breakfast, increasing the size of his herd to no more than 35 head, and, of course, going organic.

 

To accomplish these goals, Mark has already fenced his portion of the Rio Feliz into a riparian pasture for dormant season grazing; divided the ranch into 11 paddocks using electric fencing; picked out sites for six drinkers; installed wildlife feeders; and begun using his cattle in a carefully controlled manner that is compatible with the area’s ecology. “I’ve done rotational grazing in four different states,” says Mark, alluding to his experience in the Southwest. “It works.”

 

On portions of the ranch, especially while standing at the top of the crumbling, 15 foot banks of the bone-dry Rio Feliz, it is hard to imagine how restoration is possible. But Mark is confident of his ability. “I can’t wait until this land comes back,” says Mark, his hand sweeping across a desiccated landscape. “And it will.”

 

That’s because what Mark wants to sell ultimately is good stewardship.

 

Going Organic

By Mark’s calculation, he has been an unofficial “organic” rancher for most of his life. He doesn’t use pesticides or herbicides in his operation; his cattle are grass fed; his use of antibiotics and other drugs is practically nonexistent (rotational grazing significantly reduces fly-borne illnesses, for example); and he herds his animals in a low-stress manner. It also costs less. “It’s more economical to raise beef naturally,” says Mark, in summation.

 

All he has to do now to become certified is use organic feed exclusively and document all his activities on paper. “What they want to see most during an inspection,” says Mark, “is a plan”, which should be no sweat for Mark since planned grazing lies at the heart of his operation anyway. Equally important, however, is the market. Through the New Mexico Organic Livestock Co-op, which Mark praises as the “best one he’s been involved with,” he will earn a “label” that he can use to sell his organic beef in any market that wants it. He plans to start locally, in Ruidoso and Roswell, then, expand into larger markets.

 

Part of his goal is control. “Conventional cows are sold five to seven times before they hit the table,” says Mark. “I want more control of the process, from raising the cow to the steak in the icebox.” He thinks this control will create a tastier, healthier product; one that the public will desire.

 

“A lot of people think organic is just a fad,” he says, smiling again, “but I know it’s not. I looked into it.” According to Mark, the organic market in general is growing by approximately 25% per year, making it the fastest growing segment of agriculture in America.

 

So why are there only four certified livestock producers in New Mexico, especially if demand is rising so rapidly and profits are good? “Most ranchers don’t want to deal with the trouble,” replies Mark, “and that’s all right with me.”

 

For Mark, the bottom line is his high quality-of-life. His satisfaction comes from knowing he is healing land, producing healthy food for people, helping wildlife, and protecting a little bit of open space, while providing a nourishing environment for his wife and two children. “To me, organic means having a lot of options,” says Mark. These days, having options is big news.

 

 

PROFILE

3. ORGANIC WHEAT GROWERS’ CO-OP BOOSTS INCOME FOR NORTHERN NEW MEXICO FARMERS

Adapted from: http://spectre.nmsu.edu/media/news2.lasso?i=28 , Date: 12/19/2001

For more information contact: Denise McWilliams, (505) 646-3455, demcwill@nmsu.edu , or Del Jimenez, (505) 852-2668, djimenez@nmsu.edu

 

QUESTA - Lupe Young, a grower whose family began farming in the northern town of Questa in the early 1900s, stopped producing wheat in 1984 because declining wheat prices and rising fuel and equipment costs wiped out his profits.

 

But in 1997, Young began growing organic wheat as part of the newly formed Sangre de Cristo Agricultural Producers cooperative. This year, he sold 140,000 pounds of organic wheat and flour through the co-op, earning a net profit of nearly $46,000.

 

"The co-op helped us switch to organic production, and that's the key to our profitability," Young said. "The co-op has also helped us develop good, dependable markets. It's really saved us in wheat production."

 

The co-op was founded in 1995 with the help of New Mexico State University's Cooperative Extension Service and the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) to assist northern New Mexico growers in producing and marketing organic wheat and other products.

 

NMSU's Rural Agricultural Improvement and Public Affairs Project (RAIPAP) has worked closely with the growers since the co-op's creation, providing technical assistance and education for members. In fact, the five founding members of the co-op were inexperienced farmers who originally sought Extension's help to learn the basics of agricultural production before launching commercial ventures.

 

"I started them with wheat because it was an easy crop to learn, and many of these people were one or two generations removed from agriculture,” said Del Jimenez, agriculture specialist with RAIPAP. "We went with organic simply because we didn't have enough money to buy fertilizer. I never thought it would come this far.”

 

As the co-op gained momentum, more experienced growers like Lupe Young joined, taking advantage of Extension's assistance to switch to organic production and sell through the cooperative. The co-op currently has nine members, mostly from Questa and Costilla north of Taos. Another five growers were expected to join in early 2002.

 

The key to the co-op's success is its organic product, which commands much higher prices than conventionally grown wheat. “Organic wheat currently sells for 11.6 cents per pound, compared with about 3.3 cents per pound for conventional wheat,” Jimenez said. Moreover, since 1998, the co-op has milled all its wheat into organic flour, which is then sold to customers in New Mexico at 30 cents per pound. The wheat is milled and bagged with Sangre de Cristo labels by Rocky Mountain Milling, an organic mill in Platteville, Colorado.

 

After deducting production, transportation costs and payment to the co-op, members receive another 5 cents per pound for the flour. “Thus, co-op growers receive a total net profit of 16.6 cents per pound for organic wheat and flour, or more than five times the 3.3 cents per pound that conventional growers earn selling wheat on the open market,” Jimenez said.

 

Co-op members have slowly but steadily built up a niche market in New Mexico with assistance from the NMDA. “They went 'door-to-door' so to say,” Jimenez said. “They've worked hard to build up a local brand name by promoting their flour as an organic product wholly produced in New Mexico by New Mexico growers.” Indeed, their biggest client is Santa Fe-based Cloud Cliff Bakery, which launched a completely new organic bread made from Sangre de Cristo co-op flour and dubbed it ‘Pan Nativo,’ Spanish for ‘Native Bread’. “Cloud Cliff buys about 12,000 pounds of flour per month from the co-op and bakes 10,000 to 12,000 loaves of Pan Nativo monthly for natural food stores and retailers such as Sam's Club,” said owner Willem Malten.

 

“The bread's name denotes the native character of the whole project, and that's our selling point,” Malten said. “The intent is to use 100 percent local ingredients produced by local farmers and made into bread by a local bakery. It's my best-selling product.”

 

Co-op production has grown immensely over the last six years, from 40,000 pounds of wheat in 1997 to a 560,000-pound bumper crop this year. “Production in 2001 was the best we've ever had,” Jimenez said. “The growers' knowledge and experience has grown each year, so yields have increased. The numbers are particularly good this year (2001) because they got the crop in early, there were good rains, they irrigated more, and there were few problems with insects and disease.”

 

In 2002, growers will begin a crop rotation program financed in part by a $10,000 grant from the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program. They will rotate wheat with legumes-beginning with peas-to build nitrogen in the soil and diversify their organic products for market.

 

Although the co-op has greatly benefited all its members, perhaps the biggest advantage is for small-scale growers like David Cordova, one of the five founding members. This year, Cordova earned nearly $10,000 from the wheat he grew on his 40-acre farm in Garcia, Colorado, which borders Costilla, accounting for about 40 percent of his family's $25,000 annual income. “There are no opportunities up here, so we do whatever we can to get by,” Cordova said. “The co-op has given us a much better income, and it's kept me from having to work somewhere else.”

 

 

 

 


 

CHAPTER 3 – FOUR CORNERS STATES ORGANIC RESOURCES

 

ARIZONA

 

 

___________________________________________

State Organic Producer Organizations:

None at this time.

 

 

___________________________________________

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers in Arizona:

 

Arizona Department of Agriculture Organic Certification Program

Katie Decker is the Arizona Department of Agriculture’s organic contact. Although Arizona is currently not accredited to complete organic certification under USDA’s standards, she can refer all interested parties to independent certifiers out of state.

Contact Information:

Katie Decker

Public Information Officer

AZ Dept. of Agriculture

1688 W. Adams, Room 124

Phoenix, AZ 85007

Phone: (602) 542-0958

E-mail: kdecker@azda.gov

 

 

Independent Organic Certifying Agents and Organizations

For a list of accredited independent certifiers who have certified/inspected organic farms in the Four Corner region please see page 5.

 

Shanti Leinow

The owner of Whipstone Farm, Shanti Leinow, is an independent organic inspector. In the past she has worked with organic certifying agencies to inspect and certify farms in Arizona. Contact her for more information about how to get certified in Arizona.

Contact Information:

Shanti Leinow

21640 N. Juniper Ridge Rd.

Paulden, AZ 86334

Phone: (928) 636-6209

Fax: (928) 636-9489

E-mail: whipstone@aol.com

Website: http://www.prescottfarmersmarket.org/vendors/WhipstoneFarm.htm

 

 

___________________________________________

Analytical Laboratories:

The following analytical laboratories are listed because they are convenient for producers in the region. They each perform basic soil, water, and plant tests, all of which address agricultural needs, but may fall short of the specific in-depth analyses sought by organic producers.

 

Further analyses may be outsourced to labs which perform cutting edge testing specific to organic production needs. These labs are found on page 9 of this guide.

 

Central Analytical Laboratory

Soil, Plant, and Water Analysis Laboratory

∞ Soil test cost: $3.50 for pH test; other tests priced separately. To submit sample: Take soil sample to lab or mail it to the address below.

Common regional problems: Metal contamination, acidic-to-neutral soils.

Contact Information:

Dept. of Soil, Water and Environmental Science

2601 East Airport Drive

Tucson, AZ 85706

Phone: (520) 626-2034

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/SWES/research/index.htm

 

Department of Plant Pathology

Offers services in disease diagnosis, plant and weed identification, and nematode detection.

Contact Information:

Street address: 1140 E. South Campus Drive Room 204 Mailing address: Division of Plant Pathology & Microbiology College of Agriculture and Life Sciences PO Box 210036 Tucson, AZ 85721-0036 Phone: (520) 621-1828 Fax: (520) 621-9290 Email: lsp@u.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/general/departments/plantpathologydivision.html

 

Plant Clinic

Performs plant disease diagnostics.

Contact Information:

Mike Matheron, Extension Plant Pathologist

University of Arizona

Yuma Agriculture Center

6425 W. 8th Street

Yuma, AZ 85364

Phone: (928) 726-0458

Email: matheron@ag.arizona.edu

 

Plant Pathologist

Performs plant disease diagnostics.

Contact Information:

Mary Olsen, Extension Plant Pathologist

Department of Plant Pathology

Forbes Building 204

University of Arizona

Tucson, AZ 85721

Phone: (928) 626-2681

Fax: (928) 621-9290

Email: molsen@ag.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/PLP/plpext/

 

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

The AzVDL is a part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) and is home to several mutually supportive laboratory disciplines, including pathology, microbiology, immunology and toxicology.

Contact Information:

Greg Bradley, Director

2831 N. Freeway

Tucson, Arizona 85705

Phone: (520) 621-2356

Fax: (520) 626-8696

E-mail: azvdl@ag.arizona.edu

 

 

 

_________________________________________

Marketing Services:

 

Arizona Community Farmers’ Markets Group

The Arizona Community Farmers’ Market Group encourages Arizona producers, particularly small local farmers who use pesticide-free or organic growing methods, to participate in farmers’ markets around the state.

Contact Information:

Dee or John Logan, Coordinators

Nancy Cumbo, Manager

PO Box 14188

Phoenix, AZ 85063-4188

Phone: (623) 848-1234

Fax: (623) 848-8253

E-mail: azfarmersmarket@cox.net

Website: www.farmersmarketsaz.blogspot.com

 

Arizona Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association - AFDMA

AFDMA is a new organization consisting of farmers and ranchers throughout the state of Arizona who work to educate and inform consumers about the importance of agriculture in their lives. They also provide a support network for farmers and ranchers throughout the state.

Contact Information:

Russ Tronstad

Department of Ag & Resource Economics Econ 434 University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 Phone: (520) 621-2425

E-mail: tronstad@ag.arizona.edu

 

Arizona Grown

The Arizona Department of Agriculture has developed a marketing program to showcase Arizona food and agricultural products. The goal of the program is to make it easier for consumers, retailers and restaurants to identify and purchase Arizona products. They have created a bright, distinctive Arizona Grown logo series to help residents in the state, other states, and other countries easily identify high quality Arizona foods, fibers and beverages. Producers may contact them for a computer disk in order to print the logo, but there is not a specific ‘organic’ Arizona label.

Contact Information:

Arizona Department of Agriculture

1688 West Adams Street

Phoenix, Arizona 85007

Phone: (602) 542-6408

Website: http://www.azda.gov/Main/logo.htm

 

Center for Sustainable Environments at Northern Arizona University

Cosponsors of the ‘Fresh, Organic, and Native Foods of the Four Corners’ Directory, the Flagstaff Community Farmers’ Market, Flagstaff Supported Agriculture, and the Flagstaff Community Supported Wild Foraging Project. They also facilitate wild foods and sustainable agricultural consulting.

1) Canyon Country Fresh

The Center for Sustainable Environments sponsors ‘Canyon Country Fresh’; a spin-off of the Arizona Grown Program, Canyon County Fresh provides labels to Northern Arizona farmers and ranchers to distinguish locally raised products and to encourage customers to support sustainability by purchasing locally.

Website: www.environment.nau.edu/ccf

Contact Information:

Katherine Freeman

Hanley Hall, Bldg. 7

PO Box 5675

Flagstaff, AZ 86011

Phone: (928) 523-0637

Fax: (928) 523-8223

E-mail: environment@nau.edu

Website: www.environment.nau.edu/ccf/

 

Community Food Connection

A non-profit organization that provides assistance to the development of farmers’ markets and other direct marketing programs by enhancing local food security. They have helped to develop the Senior and Women, Infant, Children (WIC) Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program and use of the Food Stamp Program at farmers’ markets in Arizona. The organization is also home to the Arizona Food and Agricultural Policy Council.

Contact Information:

Cindy Gentry

PO Box 22216

Phoenix, AZ 85028

Phone: (602) 493-5231

E-mail: cgentry@foodconnect.org

Website: www.foodconnect.org

 

Prescott College Community Supported Agriculture

The PCCSA is a cooperative CSA, which gets its food from several small, certified and/or naturally grown farms. By using a cooperative model they are able to support several farmers around the state and also provide a variety of produce to consumers throughout the year. Depending on the season this includes; vegetables, fruits, nuts, and honey, as well as the option to buy eggs, meat, goat milk, and cheese. Contact Heather or Meghan to learn more about the CSA model, or to become an organic farmer-member.

Contact Information:

Heather Houk or Meghan Gould, 2005 Farm/CSA Manager

301 Grove Ave.

Prescott, AZ 86301

Phone: Heather – (928) 350-1007, or Meghan – (928) 778-2090 ext. 1401

E-mail: pccsa@prescott.edu

Website: http://www.prescott.edu/highlights/csa.html

 

Southwest Marketing Network

The goal of the SWMN is to ensure that new, existing, and prospective Southwest producers, especially small-scale, alternative, and minority producers, have the connections with others, technical and financial assistance, marketing information, business and marketing skills, and peer examples needed to improve their marketing success as a means to improve their profitability, viability, and success. They support and facilitate conferences, newsletters, and training sessions.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Project Co-Coordinator

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

Website: www.swmarketing.ncat.org

 

 

__________________________________________

Educational and Research Services:

 

Arizona Food and Agricultural Policy Council

The Arizona Food and Agriculture Policy Council is a vehicle to work with public and private entities towards strengthening all of Arizona’s access to sufficient, high-quality food; strengthening the economy of Arizona’s ranches, farms, and value-adding food processors.

Contact Information:

Cindy Gentry

PO Box 22216

Phoenix, AZ 85028

Phone: (602) 493-5231

E-mail: cgentry@foodconnect.org

Website: www.foodconnect.org

 

 

 

__________________________________________

Organic Businesses:

 

Seed Vendors - Organic

1) Native Seeds/ SEARCH

∞ Catalog $1

∞ Specializes in heirloom seed varieties from Mexico and the SW Native tribes. Sells dried peppers and other products.

Contact Information:

526 N. 4th Ave

Tucson, AZ 85705

Phone: (520) 622-5561

Fax: (520) 622-5591

E-mail: nss@azstarnet.com

Website: www.nativeseeds.org

 

2) Seeds Trust, Inc .

The Seeds Trust offers an ‘ Organic Seeds Trust ’ link on their website, which allows quick access to an organic and wildcrafted seeds section. As an organization they have always supported organic farming and organic gardening. All the organic seeds are marked in the catalog with an asterisk (*).

Contact Information:

PO Box 596

Cornville, AZ 86325

Phone: (928) 649-3315

Fax: (928) 649-8181

E-mail: support2@seedtrust.com

Website: http://www.seedstrust.com

 

 

___________________________________________

Publications:

The publications in this list have been selected from the University of Arizona Agricultural Department, Cooperative Extension, and Experiment Station archive. They include articles written by University of Arizona faculty and affiliates, grant-funded publications, and Cooperative Extension fact sheets. They contain information relative to organic production: organic and niche marketing strategies; soil and water quality concerns and testing; and information about composting and manure management, vegetable and fruit production, weed management, irrigation, and (integrated) pest management.

The publications were reviewed for their relevancy to organic production issues, however, may still contain information that is not necessarily compliant with the USDA’s National Organic Standards. For specific questions about organic compliance, contact Arizona Department of Agriculture’s state organic contact: Katie Decker, at (602) 542-0958, or e-mail: kdecker@azda.gov .

Many of Cooperative Extension’s publications are available on-line and can be accessed free of charge through the University of Arizona’s Cooperative Extension Resource Center’s (CERC) website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/index.html , or through a search feature at: http://cals.arizona.edu/pubs/ . Hard copies can be accessed directly from Liz Haro at the Publication Distribution Center (PDC). Call: (520) 318-7275, or e-mail: haro@ag.arizona.edu.

 

Composting

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

V-220 Compost: Materials, Containers, and Methods [VHS] (2001, $10/each)

 

Directories

1) Clark, R., Nabhan, G., Taylor, N. Fresh, Organic, and Native: Foods of the Four Corners. Flagstaff, AZ: The Center for Sustainable Environments, Volume 3, No. 1.

 

Farm Management and Marketing

1) Thompson, Gary D. 2002. International Consumer Demand for Organic Foods. HortTechnology 10:663-674

 

2) Thompson, Gary D. and Julia Kidwell. 1998. Explaining the Choice of Organic Produce: Cosmetic Defects, Prices, and Consumer Preferences. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 80:227-287;

 

3) Thompson, Gary D. 1998. Consumer Demand for Organic Foods: What We Know and What We Need to Know. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 80:1113-1118.

 

4) Marketing Produce – Contains information on developing marketing infrastructure and dealing with marketing agents:

http://ag.arizona.edu/OALS/ALN/aln46/luna.html#luna1anchor

 

5) Umberger, W. and D. Thilmany. Honeyacre Produce Company: Successfully Adapting to Change. A Chapter in Western Profiles of Innovative Agricultural Marketing from Direct Farm Marketing and Agri-Tourism Enterprises. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension. Pp.93-100. ISBN: 0-9748669-0-3.

 

6) Umberger, W., L. Lev and R. Tronstad. Guiding Principles for Innovative Direct Marketing of Agricultural Products. A Chapter in Western Profiles of Innovative Agricultural Marketing from Direct Farm Marketing and Agri-Tourism Enterprises. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension. Pp.119-122. ISBN: 0-9748669-0-3.

 

7) Cooperative Extension On-line Resources:

 

Economics

A21325 Direct Farm Marketing and Tourism Handbook. A guide designed to help farm and ranch operators (and other individuals who grow or process food products) market their products and services directly to the consumer. Cost: $10.

http://cals.arizona.edu/arec/pubs/dmkt/dmkt.html

Farm Fresh. Where and When to Buy Fresh Produce in Yavapai County. http://cals.arizona.edu/yavapai/farmfresh/

Farm-Fresh and Sun-Ripened in Arizona. Where & When to Buy Fresh Produce. http://cals.arizona.edu/crops/counties/maricopa/veggies/farmfresh.html

Sustainable Agriculture in Arizona. http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/sustainableag/farmers.html

 

Food Safety

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

A21079 Pesticide versus Organically grown Food. Part of Food Safety Tips, College of Agriculture. Find it on-line at: http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/health/foodsafety/az1079.html Cost: Free.

 

Soil Quality and Testing

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

A21111 Laboratories Conducting Soil, Plant, Feed, or Water Testing (2004) (2 pp.) Cost: Free.

SRU-10 Soils [Student Reference] (1973) (62 pp.) Cost: $5.50.

 

Water Quality

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

WEEC05 Arizona Water Map (2002) Cost: $8.

194014-20 Microorganisms in Your Well Water (1994) (1 pp.) Cost: (Set of 7) $0.75/each.

Water Wells (1998) (2 pp.)

AZ1010 Mound Systems: Alternative On-site Wastewater Treatment (1998) (2 pp.) Cost: Free.

 

Vegetable Production

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AZ1348 Vegetable Report (individual reports available as PDF files) (2000) (189 pp.) Cost: Free.

AZ1106 Guide to Symptoms of Plant Nutrient Deficiencies (1999) (3 pp.) Cost: Free.

 

Weeds

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

UCD3421 Weeds [Teacher Reference] (1970) (16 pp.) Cost: $5.

 

 

Trees, Small Fruits, and Nuts

1) Organic Lemon Production – Organic Fertility Inputs

A study done at the Yuma Agricultural Center-Mesa Station to measure the feasibility of organic lemon production in the desert southwest of Arizona, with an emphasis on organic fertility inputs. A report on the first year (2000), by Mohammed Zerkoune, Glenn Wright, David Kerns, and William McCloskey, is on the web at:

http://www.ag.arizona.edu/pubs/crops/az1275/09.pdf

 

Livestock and Poultry

1) Cooperative Extension On-line Resources:

AZ1012 Manure Use and Management (1998) (2 pp.) Cost: Free.

 

Irrigation

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AZ1220 Methods of Determining When to Irrigate (2001) (7 pp.) Cost: Free.

V-116 Drip Irrigation for the Home Garden and Landscape (Video) (1989) Cost: $20.

AZ1344 Harvesting Rainwater for Landscape Use (1998) (39 pp.) Cost: $1.

AZ 1151 Irrigating Citrus Trees (2000) (5 pp.) Cost: Free.

AZ1130 Measuring Water Flow and Rate (AZ Water Series #24) (1999) (4 pp.) Cost: Free..

AZ1329 Measuring Water Flow in Surface Irrigation Ditches and Gated Pipe (2004) (9 pp.) Cost: Free.

Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Four Corners Irrigation Workshop (2004) (56 pp.)

AZ1204 Timing the First Post-plant Irrigation (2001) (2 pp.) Cost: Free.

190491 Arizona Irrigation Scheduling System (AZSCHED): Users Handbook (2003) (17 pp.) Cost: $10.

AZ1157 Determining the Amount of Irrigation Water Applied to a Field (2000) (3 pp.) Cost: Free.

AZ1130 Measuring Water Flow and Rate (AZ Water Series #24) (1999) (4 pp.) Cost: Free.

 

Pest Management

1) Extension Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program – Organic Resources Listed

http://ag.arizona.edu/crops/pesticides/pesticidealts.html#organics

 

2) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

193016 Master Gardener Entomology Manual (1994) (80 pp.) Cost: $7.

TRU-6 Plant Diseases [Teacher Reference] (1970) (12 pp.) Cost: $1.

AZ1050 Pesticide Drift (1998) (4 pp.) Cost: Free.

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________

University of Arizona Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and Marketing of Organic Products:

The faculty and staff in this list have been selected from employees of the land grant University system in Arizona. They have been identified as those who have expertise and interest in the production and marketing of organic products. Many University of Arizona Cooperative Extension staff members have received training through a Western Regional SARE Grant in order to provide assistance to constituents in the areas of sustainable and organic production.

 

1. Steven J. Campbell

County Director, Navajo County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Agricultural consulting for farmers, ranchers, and homeowners

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing in order to provide assistance to constituents in these areas

Contact Information:

402 Hopi Dr.

Holbrook, AZ 86205

Phone: (928) 524-6271

Fax: (928) 524-6272

E-mail: campbell@cals.arizona.edu

 

2. Robert Call

Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, Cochise County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Agricultural consulting for farmers, ranchers, and homeowners

∞ Master Gardener, Fruit and Nut Crops, Vegetable Crops, Chile Peppers, Environmental Education

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing in order to provide assistance to constituents in these areas

Contact Information:

Cochise County Cooperative Extension 450 S. Haskell Avenue Willcox, AZ 85643-2790

Phone: (520) 384-3594

Fax: (520) 384-3681

E-mail: recall@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/robertcall.html

 

 

3. Patrick Clay

Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent, Maricopa County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Organic agricultural consulting for farmers in Phoenix area

∞ Field crops, commercial agriculture, cotton, grain and forage

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing in order to provide assistance to constituents in these areas

Contact Information:

Maricopa County Cooperative Extension 4341 E. Broadway Road Phoenix, AZ 85040-8807

Phone: (602) 470-8086 ext 313

Fax: (602) 470-8092

E-mail: pclay@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/patrickclay.html

 

4. Rick Gibson

SARE State Coordinator, Cooperative Extension

∞ Commercial horticulture, Master Gardener, vegetable, fruit, nut and vine crops

∞ Sourced and contacted regularly by small farm and limited acreage organic operations with production for consulting

Contact Information:

Pinal County Cooperative Extension

820 E. Cottonwood Lane, Bldg. C

Case Grande, AZ 85222

Phone: (520) 836-5221, ext. 227

Fax: (520) 836-1750

E-mail: gibsonrd@ag.arizona.edu

 

5. Robert Grumbles

County Director/Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Mohave County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Agricultural Production, Agribusiness, Livestock, Natural Resources, Community Leadership, Master Gardener, Public Land Policies, Native American Programs, Range Water Development, 4-H Livestock

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing in order to provide assistance to constituents in these areas

Contact Information:

Mohave County Cooperative Extension 101 E. Beale Street, Suite A Kingman, AZ 86401-5827

Phone: (928) 753-3788

Fax: (928) 753-1665

E-mail: grumbles@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/robingrumbles.html

 

6. Mike Hauser

Apache County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Agricultural consulting for farmers, ranchers, and homeowners

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing

Contact Information:

Apache County Cooperative Extension

PO Box 369

St. Johns, AZ 85936-0369

Phone: (928) 337-2267

E-mail: hauser@ag.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/extension/directory/counties/apache.html

 

7. David Kerns

Extension Entomologist

∞ Integrated Pest Control; Vegetable Crops; Citrus; Insecticide resistance

Contact Information:

Yuma Valley Agricultural Center 6425 W. 8th Street Yuma, AZ 85364-9623

Phone: (520) 782-3836

Fax: (520) 782-1940

E-mail: dkerns@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/davidkerns.html

 

8. Michael Matheron

Extension Plant Pathologist & Research Scientist

∞ Plant disease diagnosis, identification, and management

Contact Information:

Yuma Mesa Agricultural Station RR 1 Box 40M Somerton, AZ 85350-9701

Phone: 928/726-0458

Fax: 928/726-1363

E-mail: matheron@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/michaelmatheron.html

 

9. Eric Norton

La Paz County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Soil fertility, agronomy, crop science, data analysis

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing

Contact Information:

La Paz County Cooperative Extension P.O. Box 3485 Parker, AZ 85344-3485

Phone: (928) 669-9843

Fax: (928) 669-9763

E-mail: enorton@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/ericnorton.html

 

10. Randy Norton

Graham County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Agronomy, horticulture, livestock production

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing

Contact Information:

Graham County Cooperative Extension P.O. Box 127 Solomon, AZ 85551-0127

Phone: (928) 428-2611

Fax: (928) 428-7023

E-mail: rnorton@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://ag.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/randynorton.html

 

11. Jim Sprinkle

County Director, Gila County Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Range Livestock Production, Beef Cattle, Animal Nutrition, Horses

∞ Received Western SARE training in the areas of sustainable and organic agricultural production and marketing

Contact Information:

Gila County Cooperative Extension P.O. Box 2844 Payson, AZ 85547-2844

Phone: (928) 474-4160

Fax: (928) 468-8289

E-mail: sprinkle@cals.arizona.edu

Website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/jimsprinkle.html

 

12. Gary Thompson

Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics Department

∞ Organic markets and consumer issues

∞ Agricultural production and marketing particularly as they relate to fresh vegetables

∞ Demand issues relating to organic produce, food safety, and health concerns

Contact Information:

Economics Department

Rm. 428

University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721

Phone: (520) 621-6249

Fax: (520) 621-6250

E-mail: garyt@ag.arizona.edu

 

13. Russ Tronstad

Professor, Agricultural and Resource Economics Department

∞ Agricultural marketing, risk management, international trade, fruit & vegetable commodities, range livestock, and field crops

Contact Information:

Department of Ag & Resource Economics Econ 434 University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 Phone: (520) 621-2425

E-mail: tronstad@ag.arizona.edu

 

14. Glenn Wright

State Citrus Specialist & Research Scientist

∞ Organic lemon (fruit) production

∞ Organic fertility inputs

Contact Information:

Yuma Mesa Agricultural Center 2186 W. County 15th Street Somerton, AZ 85350-9701

Phone: (928) 726-0458

E-mail: gwright@ag.arizona.edu

Website: http://cals.arizona.edu/extension/directory/bios/glennwright.html

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

COLORADO

 

___________________________________________

State Organic Producer Organizations:

 

Colorado Organic Producers’ Association

The Colorado Organic Producers Association (COPA) was formed in 1987 to provide education, information, and networking services to promote and facilitate the production, distribution, and consumption of Colorado organic food products. COPA members represent all segments of agriculture: production, processing, wholesale, retail, and consumer.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Director

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

Fax: (970) 588-2294

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

Website: www.organiccolorado.org

 

Colorado Organic Crop Management Association

The COCMA is a research and educational non-profit association that supports organic tree fruit research on Colorado’s western slope. Initiated in 1999 through funding from Gerber, Western SARE, and CSU’s Specialty Crops Program, they were the first to organize a national organic tree fruit research symposium in 2001 and 2003.

Contact Information:

Steve Ela – Coordinator & Board Member

30753 L Road

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-3488

E-mail: info@elafamilyfarms.com

 

Valley Organic Growers Association

VOGA is a Colorado organization whose purpose is to promote the benefits of local, holistic agriculture, land stewardship, and soil sustainability. VOGA is made up of a group of organic and sustainable producers and farming advocates in the North Fork of the Gunnison River Valley in Western Colorado. They organize weekly for meetings, run several farmers markets in that area, arrange to hear from speakers on organic issues, and publish a local growers’ directory.

Contact Information:

Ashleigh Krest, President Mailing Address:

PO Box 916

Paonia, CO 81428 Phone: (970) 527-4541 E-mail: nelhig@tds.net Website: www.vogaco.org

 

Western Colorado Horticultural Society

The Western Colorado Horticultural Society is a trade organization for fruit growers in Colorado. They organize annual meetings and a trade show, a 3-day conference in January that relates to organic tree fruit production.

Contact Information:

Larry Traubel

10827 Hwy. 65

Eckert, CO 81418

Phone: (970) 234-3424

 

 

___________________________________________

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers in Colorado:

 

Colorado Department of Agriculture’s Organic Certification Program

This program serves both the producer and consumers of organically grown crops through an application and inspection process.

∞ CDA is approved to organically certify crops, livestock, wild crop and processors.

∞ They provide links to annual state organic directories and to the USDA National Organic Program website.

∞ The Process: Forms for the various types of certification as well as the fee schedule for certification are available on the website. After an application has been received and reviewed by this office it is forwarded to an inspector in the local area. USDA standards require an annual inspection.

∞ First time applicants must contact the Department for an informational packet. Forms to renew certification are also available at the 'forms' link on the website.

Contact Information:

Don Gallegos

Organic Certification Coordinator

CO Dept. of Agriculture

700 Kipling Street, Suite 4000

Lakewood, CO 80215-5894

Phone: (303) 239-4150

Fax: (303) 239-4177

E-mail: don.gallegos@ag.state.co.us

Website: http://www.ag.state.co.us/DPI/Organic/organic.html

 

 

Independent Organic Certifying Agents and Organizations

For a list of accredited independent certifiers who have certified/inspected organic farms in the Four Corner region please see page 5.

 

 

__________________________________________

Analytical Laboratories:

The following analytical laboratories are listed because they are convenient for producers in the region. They each perform basic soil, water, and plant testing, all of which address agricultural needs, but may fall short of specific in-depth analyses sought by organic producers.

 

Further analyses may be outsourced to labs which perform cutting edge testing specific to organic production needs. These labs are found on page 9 of this guide.

 

 

Colorado Analytical Laboratory

Perform soil and STA Certified compost Testing.

Contact Information:

PO Drawer 507

240 South Main Street

Brighton, CO 80601

Phone: (303) 659-2313

Fax: (303) 659-2315

Website: www.coloradolab.com

 

Plant Diagnostic Clinic

Department of Bioagricultural Sciences & Pest Management.

∞ Soil tests: pH and salt soil testing;

∞ Plant tissue testing: microscopic and molecular plant tissue testing – some nematode analysis;

∞ Insect and plant ID.

Contact Information:

Tamla Blunt

215 Plant Sciences Building

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1177

Phone: (970) 491-6950

Email: plantlab@lamar.colostate.edu

Website: * being updated

 

Plant Diagnostic Clinic

The Jefferson County Plant Diagnostic Clinic is a non-profit laboratory/consulting service supported by Colorado State University Cooperative Extension and Jefferson County.

∞ The clinic aids in the identification and treatment of plant problems caused by disease, insect and environmental conditions.

∞ Plants, weeds and insects also are identified.

Contact Information:

Mary Small

15200 West 6th Avenue, Unit C

Golden, CO 80401

Phone: 303-271-6620

Fax: 303-271-6644

E-mail: msmall@co.jefferson.co.us

 

Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Laboratory

The Colorado State University Soil, Water and Plant Testing Laboratory analyzes soil, plant, water and manure for farmers, homeowners and researchers.

∞ Soil test cost: $18. Includes: pH, soluble salts, organic matter, N, P, K, Zn, Fe, lime, texture, Cu and Mn.

Common regional problems: Salt problems, especially with recent drought, over-fertilization, the presence of selenium.

Contact Information:

James R. Self, PhD, Lab Manager

Mary Schumm, Assistant

Room A-319 NESB

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1120

Phone: (970) 491-5061

E-mail: jself@ceres.colostate.edu , mcschumm@lamar.colostate.edu

Website: www.colostate.edu/Depts/SoilCrop/service.html

 

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

‘The laboratory is accredited by the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians and offers services in bacteriology, chemistry/toxicology, clinical pathology, endocrinology, immunology, parasitology, pathology, serology, and virology.’

Contact Information:

Mailing Address:

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

300 West Drake

Fort Collins, CO 80523

Phone: (970) 297-1281

Fax: (970) 297-0320

Website: www.dlab.colostate.edu

 

 

___________________________________________

Marketing Services:

 

Colorado Apple Administrative Committee

Resource used to connect organic apple growers, packers, and shippers on Colorado’s western slope.

Contact Information:

Jonathan Allen

215 Silver St.

Delta, CO 81416

Phone: (970) 240-8373

Fax: (970) 240-8426

E-mail: jon@firstfruits.com

Website: www.coloradoapples.com

 

Colorado Crop to Cuisine

A grower distribution organization, located in Fort Collins that connects local producers with restaurant, school, and retail accounts. CCC works with many small organic producers.

Contact Information:

Katy Pepinsky

PO Box 410

Fort Collins, CO 80522

Phone: (970) 231-1807

E-mail: pepinsky@lamar.colostate.edu

Website: www.geocities.com/coloradocrop

 

Colorado Department of Agriculture’s Marketing Division

1) Organic Program

A free-marketing program developed by the Colorado Department of Agriculture, to help consumers, restaurants, and retailers identify and purchase Colorado food and agricultural products.

∞ COLORADO PROUD is a labeling program offered by CDA to identify and market items grown or produced in Colorado. Within this program, a COLORADO ORGANIC logo is available to market Colorado agricultural products that have been certified by a federally accredited organic certification program. Contact CDA’s Marketing Division to receive free software to print labels or for already printed labels available at cost.

Contact Information:

Jim Rubingh & Wendy White

Colorado Department of Agriculture Markets Division

700 Kipling St., Suite 4000

Lakewood, CO 80215-8000

Phone: (303) 239-4149

Fax: (303) 239-4125

E-mail: markets@ag.state.co.us

Website (order form): http://www.ag.state.co.us/mkt/Forms/ProudOrderFormCalc.htm

 

2) Colorado Farm Fresh Directory

Identifies many organic farmers and agricultural marketing opportunities around the state. Farmers may list their information annually at no charge. To be added to the database, please complete the " Colorado Food & Agricultural Listing Form ", available on the web, and send to:

Contact Information:

Colorado Department of Agriculture

Markets Division

700 Kipling St., Suite 4000

Lakewood, CO 80215

Phone: (303) 239-4114

Fax: (303) 239-4125700

Website: http://www.ag.state.co.us/mkt/default.asp

 

Colorado Farmers’ Market Association

CFMA is an association of the managers and owners of farmers markets, providing resources, communication, advocacy, and access to a group general liability insurance policy for markets. It represents about 95% of the markets in Colorado, with 55 members. The association has many organic farmer-members.

Contact Information:

CFMA

C/o Mark Parsons

1316 Wilfred Ct

Berthoud, CO 80513

Phone: (970) 532-2591

E-mail: sueandmarkparson@aol.com

Website: www.coloradofarmers.org

 

Colorado Rural Development Cooperative Services

Assists small growers in forming business cooperatives. Works in conjunction with the Rocky Mountain Farmers’ Union Cooperative Development Program.

∞ Dolores is also the state contact for Value-Added Agricultural Producer Grants (USDA-RBCS) in Colorado.

Contact Information:

Dolores Sanchez-Maes

Lakewood State Office

655 Parfet Street, Room E-100

Lakewood, CO 80215

Phone: (720) 544-2927

Website: www.rurdev.usda.gov

 

Marketing Support

1) Creative Resources

Performs writing, communications, marketing, publicity, and design for organic and natural foods and fabrics.

Contact Information:

Elaine Lipson

3755 Birchwood #48

Boulder, CO 80304

Phone: (303) 442-2432

 

2) New Hope Communications/Natural Products Expo.

Organizes the largest natural organic products industry exposition and conference in the United States.

Contact Information:

Mary Cote

1301 Spruce St.

Boulder, CO 80302

Phone: (303) 939-8440

E-mail: tradeshows@newhope.com

 

3) Natural Business Communications

Provides executive level business financial and investment news and information for the natural and organic products industry.

Contact Information:

Darrin Duber-Smith Director of Sales and Marketing Natural Business Communications P. O. Box 7370 Boulder, CO 80301

Telephone: (303) 442-8983 Fax: (303) 440-7741

 

Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

RMFU serves the interests of independent family farmers and ranchers throughout Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming by improving the well being of family producers and their communities through legislation, cooperation and education. The Cooperative Development Center at the RMFU supports organic producer cooperative organizations. Some of the projects they have been involved in include: The New Mexico Front Range Organics Cooperative , The Organic Alfalfa and Feed Grains Cooperative , and several Regional Supply and Delivery Cooperatives for Small Organic Producers.

Contact Information:

Lee Swenson, Director

or Dan Hobbs, Cooperative Development Specialist

5655 S. Yosemite Street, Suite 400

Greenwood Village, CO 80111

Phone: (303) 752-5800

Fax: (303) 752-5810

E-mail: rmfu@rmfu.org

Website: http://www.co-ops.org/

 

Santa Fe Family Farmers’ Co-op

The Santa Fe Family Farmers’ Coop is a distributor to regional retailers in New Mexico and Colorado of local produce with an emphasis on organic. They deliver primarily to the areas of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and Durango, CO.

∞ They have a warehouse in La Jara, Colorado in the San Luis Valley.

∞ They will buy certified or registered organic products.

∞ They serve both members of the cooperative and those who are unaffiliated.

∞ They have a direct-to-consumer food box program, in which they deliver boxes of seasonal produce from co-op producer-members directly to peoples’ homes.

Contact Information:

Martin Connaughton

PO Box 1468

Santa Cruz, NM 87567

Phone: (505) 471-3345

E-mail: comments@santafefarmers.com

Website: www.santafefarmers.com

 

Southwest Marketing Network

The goal of the SWMN is to ensure that new, existing, and prospective Southwest producers – especially small-scale, alternative, and minority producers – have the connections with others, technical and financial assistance, marketing information, business and marketing skills, and peer examples needed to improve their marketing success as a means to improve their profitability, viability, and success. They support and facilitate conferences, newsletters, and training sessions.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Project Co-Coordinator

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

Website: www.swmarketing.ncat.org

 

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________

Educational and Research Services:

 

Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute

CRMPI, is a Permaculture training, counseling, research and development center. The Institute is part of an alliance of Permaculture activists on the cutting edge of agroforestry and other newly discovered methods of organic farming.

∞ In addition to hands-on demonstration site tours, an on-site edible landscaping nursery and Permaculture courses and seminars, CRMPI offers consulting services for Permaculture design, ecological golf course design, natural weed control, re-vegetation, edible landscaping, and high altitude greenhouse design and management.

Contact Information:

Jerome Osentowski, CRMPI Director

Mailing address:

PO Box 631

Basalt, Colorado 81621

Phone/Fax: (970) 927-4158

E-mail: jerome@crmpi.org

Website: http://crmpi.org

 

Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station

Colorado State Universities agricultural research arm. The AES does some of its research with organic farmers in the state. A number of their publications, including those relative to organic research, are available on-line.

Contact Information:

Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station Colorado State University 3001 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-3001

Phone: (970) 491-5371

Fax: (970) 491-7396

E-mail: AES@coop.ext.colostate.edu

Website: www.colostate.edu/Depts/AES

 

Colorado Food and Agricultural Policy Council

The Colorado Food and Agriculture Policy Council (CFAPC), initiated through citizen-based, grassroots activism, is a vehicle to work with public and private entities towards strengthening all of Colorado’s access to sufficient, high-quality food; strengthening the economy of Colorado’s ranches, farms, and value-adding food processors.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Director

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

Fax: (970) 588-2294

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

 

Colorado Genetic Engineering Action Network

Mission is to educate the people of Colorado on and how to take lawful actions toward addressing the risks to the environment, biodiversity, and human health as well as the socio-economic and theoretical consequences of genetic engineering.

Contact Information:

Patrick West

1140 US Hwy 287, Suite 400-125

Broomfield, CO 80020

Phone: (303) 215-3384

E-mail: info@foodlabeling.org

Website: www.foodlabeling.org

 

Colorado State University Cooperative Extension

CSU Cooperative Extension is the grass-roots educational arm of Colorado State University. Its charge is to disseminate research-based information generated by CSU to the general public. In many county offices, agricultural and small acreage management extension agents work to assist constituents with organic production and marketing issues.

Contact Information:

Marc Johnson – Interim Director

Mailing Address:

4040 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-4040

Physical Address:

1311 South College Ave.

University Square Building

Fort Collins, CO 80523

Phone: (970) 491-6281, ext. 1 (for Director’s office)

 

Fort Lewis College Environmental Center

An environmental resource for the Four Corner region. Features an on-campus organic garden, providing a vision for the campus and the community.

Contact Information:

Michael Rendon – Coordinator

1000 Rim Dr.

Durango, CO 81301

Phone: (970) 247-7091

E-mail: rendon_m@fortlewis.edu

Website: http://envcenter.fortlewis.edu

 

Front Range Organic Gardeners

Not-for-profit organic gardening club.

Contact Information:

Linda Tegtmeier

950 S. Milwaukee Way

Denver, CO 80209-5125

Phone: 303-744-7871

E-mail: goldstarauctions@juno.com

 

Guidestone Farm CSA and Center for Sustainable Living

The goals of this project are focused in environmental ethics, education, appropriate land stewardship, building a locally based economy, and renewing our connection with the earth. Guidestone offers organic farming and gardening education programs for all ages and CSA memberships.

Contact Information:

Nicholas Theisen – Educational Program Coordinator

5943 N. CR. 29

Loveland, CO 80538

Phone: (970) 461-0272

E-mail: farmhands1@yahoo.com

 

Oakhaven Permaculture Center

A Non-Profit Educational Corporation that helps Four Corners residents understand the value of a strong local economy and of living sustainably by establishing an Oakhaven community dedicated to learning, by providing classes and demonstration sites at Oakhaven, in Durango and in LaPlata County, and by applying Permaculture Ethics and Design principles, including organic cultivation, to all aspects of daily living.

Contact Information:

Tom Riesing and Christine Berven

4129 CR 124

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 359-5445

E-mail: TRiesing@aol.com

Website: www.oakhavenpc.org

 

Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF)

Have funded organic research projects in Colorado. Provides grants for research as well as working at the federal policy level to create funding for organic research.

Contact Information:

Steve Ela, Board President

30753 L Road

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-3488

E-mail: info@elafamilyfarms.com

 

 

 

Plant Environmental Research Center (PERC)

PERC is a ½ acre organic farm managed and studied by students on CSU’s campus in Fort Collins. The PERC outside grounds were established so students, researchers and other interested persons could observe horticultural plant materials "in action." They specialize in the organic production of plant starts, vegetables, and fruits.

Contact Information:

Faculty Advisor:

Harrison Hughes

Phone: (970) 491-7050

E-mail: hghughes@lamar.colostate.edu

or Frank Stonaker

Phone: (970) 491-7068

E-mail: Frank.Stonaker@colostate.edu

Website: http://studentgarden.colostate.edu/

 

Rocky Mountain Small Organic Farms Project

This project manages eight acres of organic production at the Horticulture Field Research Center in Fort Collins, Colorado. Some of their research includes vegetable, flower, and small fruit variety trials, studies of new techniques for fertility, pest, and disease management (for example by using green manures), and the development of enterprise budgets catered especially for small farmers.

Contact Information:

Frank Stonaker

Colorado State University Specialty Crops Program

Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture

1173 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1173

Phone: (970) 491-7068

E-mail: Frank.Stonaker@colostate.edu

 

Specialty Crops Program

The Specialty Crops Program at Colorado State University aims to help growers master production systems, and explore and develop market opportunities for their specialty crops. Included in this class of specialty crops are organic vegetables and herbs, nursery, fruit, turf, ornamental, and fiber.

Contact Information:

Frank Stonaker – Director, Specialty Crops Program

Debra Guenther – Specialty Crops Program Assistant

Mailing Address:

Colorado State University Specialty Crops Program

Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture

1173 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1173

Phone: (970) 491-7068

Fax: (970) 491-7745

E-mail: Frank.Stonaker@colostate.edu , Debra.Guenther@colostate.edu

Website: http://www.specialtycrops.colostate.edu/

 

 

___________________________________________

Organic Businesses:

 

BioLynceus, LLC.

Formulate organic fertilizers and soil amendments. They also do organic producer consulting and also provide Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) listed soil amendments, fertilizers, & herbicides.

Contact Information:

131 Hickory Dr.

Lyons, CO 80540

Phone: (303) 823-0374

E-Mail: rick@biolynceus.com

Website: biolynceus.com

 

Grand Mesa Discount

Supplier of farm materials to organic fruit producers in Colorado.

Contact Information:

Larry Traubel

10827 Hwy. 65

Eckert, CO 81418

Phone: (970) 835-3335

Fax: (970) 835-3325

 

M & R Durango, Inc

Sells beneficial insects and organisms. Consults and provides bio-control of pest insects. In addition, they specialize in insect parasitic nematodes and Nosema locustae spore (a grasshopper control agent).

Contact Information:

Gene Merrill

6565 Hwy 172

Ignacio, CO 81137

Phone: (970) 259-3521

 

Pawnee Butte Seed

Distributes 'biosol', an all-purpose organic fertilizer.

Contact Information:

PO Box 100

605 25th Street

Greeley, CO 80632

Phone: (970) 356-7002, or toll-free: (800) 782-5947

Fax: (970) 356-7263

E-mail: info@pawneebutteseed.com

Website: http://www.pawneebuttesseed.com/biosol.htm

 

Rocky Mountain Flour Milling

Specialize in custom milling and blending of organic wheat flours.

Contact Information:

Doug Lockwood

P.O. Box 1110

Platteville, CO 80651

Phone: (970) 785-2794

E-mail: dougl.co@bsm.com

Website: www.rockymountainmilling.com

 

Rogers Mesa Fruit Company

They are a distributor, packer, & seller of organic & transitional fruit. They work with several small family organic farms located on the high mesas of western Colorado - including the areas around Paonia, Hotchkiss, Rogers Mesa and Cedaredge, who produce sweet cherries, tree-ripened peaches, apricots, apples, and pears.

Contact Information:

Tom Alvey – Grower & General Manager

1165 3100 Rd.

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-2155

E-mail: contact@rmorganics.com

Website: www.rmorganics.com

 

Seed Vendors – of Organic Seed

1) SemTec/Nature Fresh

Some SemTec certified seed potatoes are certified organic by the Colorado State Department of Agriculture, Organic Certification. Large quantities available for commercial growers. Also specialty potatoes. A catalog is available on-line.

Contact Information:

P.O. Box 416

Center, CO 81125

Phone: (719) 754-2940

Fax: (719) 754-2946

Website: http://www.semtecseed.com

 

2) Sourcepoint Seeds

Sells chemical and pesticide free seeds to small-scale producers including vegetables, medicinal and culinary herbs, grains; and over 500 items.

∞ To receive a catalog, please call or send $3.

Contact Information:

Antetu Oihankesni

26422 Moss Rock Rd.

Hotchkiss, CO 81419-9456

Phone: (970) 835-3418

 

3) Sunnyland Seeds

All seeds sold in bulk and raised without the use of pesticides and chemicals. Specializing in wildflowers and trees of the Southwest but a few vegetable lines available.

Contact Information:

Marie Moore & Lee Gearhart

P.O. Box 385

Paradox, CO 81429

Phone: (970) 859-7248, or (505) 535-2568

 

4) Wilton's Organic Potatoes

Sells only Norgolds and Norlands grown at 8000 ft.

Contact Information:

PO Box 28

Aspen, CO 81612

 

Talbott Farms – Organic Fruit Packer

Talbott Farms is a CDA certified organic fruit packer on the western slope.

Contact Information:

Talbott Farms, Inc.

3782 F ¼ Road

Palisade, CO 81526

Phone: (970) 464-5656

E-mail: market@talbottfarms.com

Website: www.talbottfarms.com

 

Twin Peaks Seed & Grain, LLC.

Provide grain cleaning, polishing, and bagging services. They also buy and sell organic grains: beans, corn, wheat, and popcorn.

Contact Information:

Jim Hergenreder and M. Stonehocker

2060 County Road 28

Longmont, CO 80504

Phone: (303) 772-7333

E-mail: jimh@twinpeakstrading.com

Website: www.twinpeakstrading.com

 

 

 

___________________________________________

Publications:

The publications in this list have been selected from the Colorado State University (CSU) Agricultural Department, Cooperative Extension, and Experiment Station archive. They include articles written by CSU faculty and affiliates, grant-funded publications, and Cooperative Extension fact sheets. They contain information relative to organic production: organic and niche marketing strategies; soil and water quality concerns and testing; and information about composting and manure management, vegetable and fruit production, weed management, irrigation, and (integrated) pest management.

The publications were reviewed for their relevancy to organic production issues, however, may still contain information that is not necessarily compliant with the USDA’s National Organic Standards. For specific questions about organic compliance, contact Don Gallegos at the Colorado Department of Agriculture, phone: (303) 239-4150, e-mail: don.gallegos@ag.state.co.us

Many of Cooperative Extension’s publications are available on-line and can be accessed free of charge through the Colorado State University Cooperative Extension Resource Center’s (CERC) website: www.http://cerc.colostate.edu or directly from office staff. CERC also maintains a list of publications for a fee: a series of workbooks, manuals, plans, and handbooks. These can also be accessed through their on-line catalog or by calling (970) 491-6198, or toll free, (877) 692-9358.

 

Community Supported Agriculture

1) Online Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

XCM-189 Community Supported Agriculture

 

Farm Management and Marketing

1) Gary C. Smith of CSU and J. Brad Morgan of Oklahoma State, Consumer Trends and Increasing Popularity of Organic:

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/AnimSci/ran/meat/understanding.html

 

2)Organic for Profit” – a conference organized by Cooperative Extension in Brighton in 2001.

http://www.co.larimer.co.us/depts/extens/ofp/speakers.html

 

3) Loureiro, M. and S. Hine, “Discovering Niche Markets: A Comparison of Consumer Willingness to Pay for A Local (Colorado-Grown), Organic and GMO-Free Product.” Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics Vol. 34, No. 3 pp. 477-487, Dec. 2002.

 

4) Agribusiness Marketing Reports from the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Colorado State University, http://dare.agsci.colostate.edu/extension/pubs.html:

ABMR 05-01 Planning and Developing a Farmers Market: Marketing, Organizational, and Regulatory Issues to Consider

AMR 04-02 Farmers Markets and Direct Marketing for Colorado Producers

AMR 02-01 How Consumer Preferences for Meat Attributes relate to Shopping Choices

AMR 01-01 Marketing Food and Agricultural Products on the Internet

AMR 00-01 Marketing Opportunities for Natural Pork Products in the Intermountain West

AMR 00-02 Marketing Opportunities for Natural Beef Products in the Intermountain West

AMR 99-01 Community Development and the Profitability of Value-Added Meat Production and Processing

AMR 98-04 Marketing Food Products: Direct Sales vs. Distributors and Brokers

PFM-05-01 Enterprise Budgeting: An Application to San Luis Valley Grass-Fed Cattle Operations

AMR 04-03 Direct Marketing Agricultural Products to Restaurants: The Case of Colorado Crop to Cuisine

 

4) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

4.007 Farmers' Markets

 

Soil Quality and Testing

1) Jessica Davis & Jami Daniel, Impacts on the soil from transitioning to organic production:

http://www.ofrf.org/publications/Grant%20reports/00.49.15.Davis.Fall00.IB12.pdf

 

2) C.W. Basham and J.E. Ells, “Fertilizing the organic garden”, July 2002.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/garden/07217.html

 

3) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

0.500 Soil Sampling

0.501 Soil Testing

0.502 Soil Test Explanation

0.503 Managing Saline Soils

0.504 Managing Sodic Soils

0.507 Soil, Water and Plant Testing

0.518 Controlling Soil Erosion from Wind

0.519 Managing Soil Compaction

0.520 Selecting an Analytical Laboratory

0.521 Diagnosing Saline and Sodic Soil Problems

0.545 Zinc and Iron Deficiencies

0.546 Organic Materials as Nitrogen Fertilizers

0.550 Nitrogen Sources and Transformations

7.235 Choosing a Soil Amendment

0.560 Cattle Manure Application Rates

0.561 Manure Spreader Calibration

0.565 Update on Manure and Effluent Recommendations

1.222 Liquid Manure Application to Cropland

1.223 Liquid Manure Application Methods

1.224 Composting Horse Manure in Dynamic Windrows

1.225 Composting Horse Manure in Static Windrows

1.226 Vermicomposting Horse Manure

 

4) CSU Master Gardener Fact Sheets:

S34 Earthworms

S12 Cover Crops and Green Manure Crops

S44 Organic Fertilizers

 

Water Quality

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

0.507 Soil, Water and Plant Testing

 

Vegetable Production

1) CSU Specialty Crops Program funded projects and research results:

http://www.hla.colostate.edu/ (Scroll to “program areas” in left margin and select “specialty crops”.) Results are in PowerPoint.

Weeds

1) Thaddeus Gourd, Flame control of weeds in berry and peach production – Links to research summaries and photos are available on the web:

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/Adams/ag/currentprojects.htm

 

2) Rick Zimmerman, Investigating the Impact of Green Manures and Weed Mat on Soil Biota and Tree Growth in Organic Peach Tree Orchards: First year report.

For a copy contact: Rick Zimmerman, Research Scientist/Extension Specialist: Organic/Sustainable Agriculture, Western Colorado Research Center at Rogers Mesa, 3060 Highway 96, Hotchkiss, CO 81419, Phone: (970) 872-3387, ext. 1, E-mail: rzim@lamar.colostate.edu

 

Trees, Small Fruits, and Nuts

1) Matt Rogoyski, Two-Step Blossom Thinning Method for Organic Apple Production.

For a copy contact: Western Colorado Research Center at Rogers Mesa, 3060 Highway 96, Hotchkiss, CO 81419, Phone: (970) 872-3387

 

Irrigation

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

XCM-173 Best Management Practices for Irrigation Management

 

Pest Management

1) Colorado Environmental Pesticide Education Program – includes resources on organic:

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/SoilCrop/extension/CEPEP/organic.htm

 

2) Bonnie Ennis, “Organic pest controls that work”, May 2002.

http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/PHC/organic.htm

3) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

5.556 Bacillus thuringiensis

2.945 Friendly Pesticides for Home Gardens

5.569 Insect Control: Horticultural Oils

5.547 Insect Control: Soaps and Detergents

 

 

___________________________________________

Colorado State University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and Marketing of Organic Products:

The faculty and staff in this list have been selected from employees of the land grant University system in Colorado. They have been identified as those who have expertise and interest in the production and marketing of organic products.

 

1. Bruce Bosley

CSU Cooperative Extension Extension Agent, Logan County

∞ Agriculture

∞ Crop Rotation

∞ Genetically Modified Organisms

∞ Weed Management

∞ Sustainable Agriculture

∞ Soil Management

Contact Information:

CSU Cooperative Extension

508 South 10th Avenue Suite 1 Sterling, CO 80751-3408

Phone: (970) 522-3200, then dial 285

Fax: (970) 522-7856

E-mail: dbbosley@coop.ext.colostate.edu

 

2. Robbie Baird-Levalley

Livestock Agent, CSU Cooperative Extension, Delta

∞ Niche beef marketing and production

Contact Information:

CSU Cooperative Extension

525 Dodge Street Delta, CO 81416-1719

Phone: (970) 874-2195

Fax: (970) 847-2192

E-mail: rblevall@coop.ext.colostate.edu

 

 

3. Adrian Card

CSU Cooperative Extension Agent, Boulder County

∞ Small farm/small acreage management

∞ Organic production systems, vegetable production, small-scale intensive high-value production

∞ Weed management

∞ Direct marketing

∞ ‘Small Farm Listserv’ – a way to connect Colorado agriculturalists and consumers interested in the issues that surround small farms

∞ Coordinator - Northern Colorado Food and Agriculture Policy Council, Adams/Boulder County

Contact Information:

Department: CSU Cooperative Extension

Mailing Address:

9595 Nelson Rd., Box B

Longmont, CO 80501

Phone: (303) 678-6383

Fax: (303) 678-6281

E-mail: acard@co.boulder.co.us

Website: www.coopext.colostate.edu/boulder/AG/agr.shtml

 

4. Wayne Cooley

CSU Cooperative Extension, Tri-River Area Director

∞ Alternative Crops

∞ Soil Management

∞ Sustainable Agriculture

∞ Weed Management

Contact Information:

CSU Cooperative Extension

525 Dodge Street Delta, CO 81416-1719

Phone: (970) 874-2195

Fax: (970) 874-2192

E-mail: wcooley@coop.ext.colostate.edu, or wcooley@co.mesa.co.us

 

5. Whitney Cranshaw

Professor/Research Scientist, Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management

∞ Extension Entomology

Contact Information:

Office:

C201 Plant Sciences

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523

Phone: (970) 491-6781

Lab:

E202 Plant Sciences

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523

Phone: (970) 491-7554

E-mail: Whitney.Cranshaw@colostate.edu

 

6. Jessica Davis

Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences/Soil Scientist

∞ Effects of manure on soil fertility

∞ Soil impacts of transitioning to certified organic production

Contact Information:

Office:

C9 Plant Science Building

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado

80523-1170

Phone: (970) 491-1913

E-mail: jgdavis@lamar.colostate.edu

 

7. Addy Elliot

Research Associate, Soil and Crop Sciences/Soil Scientist

∞ Manure on soil fertility and soil impacts of transitioning to certified organic production

∞ Composting and recycling farm byproducts

Contact Information:

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado

80523-1170

Phone: (970) 491-6984, Cell: (970) 218-8305 E-mail: adriane.elliott@colostate.edu

 

8. Jack Fenwick

Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences

∞ Alternative tillage and soil management

∞ Cover crops

∞ Rotations

∞ Alternative cropping systems

Contact Information:

Office:

C105 Plant Science Building

Department of Soil and Crop Sciences

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1170

Phone: 970-491-6907

E-mail: j.fenwick@colostate.edu

9. Ron Godin

Organic/Sustainable Agricultural Specialist, CSU Cooperative Extension

∞ Organic table grape production

∞ Weed control in organic vegetables

Contact Information:

Western Colorado Research Center – Rodgers Mesa

3060 Highway 96

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-3387, ext. 5

E-mail: rgodin@lamar.colostate.edu

 

10. Thaddeus Gourd

Adams County Cooperative Extension

∞ Flame control of weeds in organic berries and peaches

Contact Information:

Adams County Cooperative Extension

9755 Henderson Rd.

Brighton, CO 80601

Phone: (303) 637-8117

Fax: (303) 637-8125

E-mail: tgourd@co.adams.co.us

 

11. Debra Guenther

Farm Manager, CSU Small Organic Farm Project/Specialty Crops Program

Contact Information:

Colorado State University Specialty Crops Program

Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture

1173 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1173

Phone: (970) 491-7068

Fax: (970) 491-7745

E-mail: Debra.Guenther@colostate.edu

 

12. Dennis Lamm

Professor, Agricultural Sciences, & State Extension SARE Coordinator

∞ Grass-fed beef

∞ Cooperative Extension

∞ The sustainability of agriculture

∞ Organic production

Contact Information:

Colorado State University

124A Shepardson

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1101

Phone: (970) 491-2074

Fax: (970) 491-4895

E-mail: Dennis.Lamm@colostate.edu

Website: www.coopext.colostate.edu/sustag

 

13. Ron F. Meyer

CSU Cooperative Extension

∞ Crop production; wheat, corn, sunflower

Contact Information:

251 16th St., Suite 101

Burlington, CO 80807

Phone: (719) 346-5571

Fax: (719) 346-5660

E-mail: Ron.Meyer@colostate.edu

Website: goldenplains.colostate.edu

 

14. Edward Page

CSU Cooperative Extension

∞ Small acreage management

∞ Facilitator - Food and Agriculture Policy Council, Tri-River Area

Contact Information:

P.O. Box 1832

Montrose, CO 81402

Phone: (970) 249-3935

E-mail: epage@coop.ext.colostate.edu

Website: www.coopext.colostate.edu/TRA/index.html#http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/TRA/staff.html

 

15. Gary Peterson

Department Head & Professor, Soil and Crop Sciences

∞ Cover crops

∞ Rotations

∞ Alternative cropping systems

Contact Information:

Office:

Room C-127

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1170

Phone: 970-491-6501 (office)

E-mail: gary.peterson@colostate.edu

 

16. Ed Sparling

Emeritus Professor, Agriculture and Resource Economics

∞ Composting and recycling farm byproducts

∞ Organic production and marketing

Contact Information:

1306 Whedbee

Fort Collins, CO 80524

Phone: (970) 407-1373

 

17. Frank Stonaker

Director, Specialty Crops Program, CSU Small Organic Farm Project

Contact Information:

Colorado State University Specialty Crops Program

Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture

1173 Campus Delivery

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1173

Phone: (970) 491-7068

Fax: (970) 491-7745

E-mail: Frank.Stonaker@colostate.edu

 

18. Dawn Thilmany

Professor, Agricultural Economics

∞ Value-added agribusiness management

∞ Specialty market analysis

∞ Farm labor and immigration

∞ Coordinator – Larimer/Weld County Local Food Policy Committee

Contact Information:

Office:

B313 Clark Building

Colorado State University

Fort Collins, CO 80523

Phone: (970) 491-7220

E-mail : dawn.thilmany@colostate.edu

 

19. Rick Zimmerman

Research Scientist/Extension Specialist: Organic/Sustainable Agriculture

Contact Information:

Western Colorado Research Center at Rogers Mesa

3060 Highway 96

Hotchkiss, CO 81419

Phone: (970) 872-3387, ext. 1

E-mail: rzim@lamar.colostate.edu

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

NEW MEXICO

 

___________________________________________

State Organic Producer Organizations:

 

New Mexico Organic Livestock Co-op

The New Mexico Organic Livestock Cooperative is a network of family-owned livestock producers who: continually strive to provide the highest quality organic New Mexico livestock products; Pioneer new methods of holistic, humane and sustainable production,; Educate the industry, producers, the market and consumers; and Share their expertise, resources, and experience for the advancement of all. The cooperative includes only Certified Organic livestock producers (meat, dairy, and animal fiber).

∞ Ranchers who are members of the NMOLC graze their animals on Certified Organic pastures, feed them Certified Organic grains, and process them in Certified Organic facilities.

∞ People who contact the Co-op can speak with turkey, chicken/eggs, beef, and sheep and lamb producers about issues specific to their area of production.

∞ The co-op practices cooperative marketing and buying.

∞ The New Mexico Organic Commodity Commission can certify ranchers and producers who may then join the co-op.

Contact Information:

Tom Delehanty

Pollo Real/Real Chicken

108 Hope Farms Road

Socorro, NM 87801

Phone: (505) 507-3123 or (505) 838-0345

E-mail: organic@zianet.com

 

 

___________________________________________

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers in NM:

 

New Mexico Organic Commodity Commission

Provides certification services and marketing assistance for organic producers, processors and retailers; and information, education and marketplace protection for consumers. Their aim is to be an effective advocate for organic production in New Mexico; to make the certification process accessible; and to rigorously ensure the truthfulness of organic claims made.

∞ Contact the NMOCC to get certified, to understand the federal organic guidelines, and to find other organic operations in NM.

∞ Applications for organic certification/registration and the certification handbook can be downloaded at: http://nmocc.state.nm.us

∞ NMOCC certified or registered growers, processor, and retailers may request software to print NMOCC Organic Labels.

∞ The NMOCC recently published a NM organic directory of markets, marketing guide, and directory of producers, processors, handlers and retailers. These are available on their website: http://nmocc.state.nm.us

Contact Information:

Joanie Quinn

New Mexico Organic Commodity Commission

4001 Indian School, NE, Suite 310

Albuquerque, NM 87110

Phone: (505) 841-9067

E-mail: joan.quinn@state.nm.us

Website: http://nmocc.state.nm.us

 

 

Independent Organic Certifying Agents and Organizations

For a list of accredited independent certifiers who have certified/inspected organic farms in the Four Corner region please see page 5.

 

 

___________________________________________

Analytical Laboratories:

The following analytical laboratories are listed because they are convenient for producers in the region. They each perform basic soil, water, and plant testing, all of which address agricultural needs, but may fall short of specific in-depth analyses sought by organic producers.

 

Further analyses may be outsourced to labs which perform cutting edge testing specific to organic production needs. These labs are found on page 9 of this guide.

 

Central Analytical Laboratory

Soil Science Physical Characterization Laboratory

∞ Soil test cost: $17. Includes: Saturated paste pH, EC, Na, CA and Mg, SAR, organic matter, nitrate-nitrogen, bicarbonate P, K and texture estimate. To submit sample: Contact lab for details.

Common regional problems: Deficiencies in Fe, N, P and K.

Contact Information:

F.W. Boyle, Jr., PhD

SWAT Laboratory

New Mexico State University Soil, Water, and Plant Testing Lab

Box 30003, Dept. 3Q - PGEL

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4422

Fax: (505) 646-5185

E-mail: swatlab.nmsu.edu

 

Plant Diagnostic Laboratory

NMSU Cooperative Extension plant diagnostic and plant pathology lab.

∞ Nematode Testing

∞ Disease Identification

Contact Information:

Gabe Ludwig or Natalie Goldberg

Mailing Address:

Natalie Goldberg

PO Box 30003

MSC. 3AE - Plant Sciences

Cooperative Extension Service

New Mexico State University

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Lab (Diseases):

(Corner of College and Knox)

Skeen Hall W242A

Phone: (505) 646-1965

Fax: (505) 646-8085

E-mail: eppdc@nmsu.edu

 

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

Performs a wide range of livestock and dairy laboratory tests including necropsy and histopathology testing.

Contact Information:

Veterinary Diagnostic Services New Mexico Dept. of Agriculture 700 Camino de Salud NE Albuquerque, NM 87106

Phone: (505) 841-2576

Fax: (505) 841-2518

 

 

 

 

 

___________________________________________

Marketing Services:

 

New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s Marketing Division

The NMDA has five divisions consisting of agricultural and environmental services, agricultural programs and resources, marketing and development, standards and consumer services, and veterinary diagnostics services. Those that could be beneficial to organic producers include:

1) Specialty Crops Program – Established in 1983, provides grant money for alternative producers and organic entities in order to fund marketing projects, demonstrations, and/or surveys, etc.

∞ Contact the New Mexico Department of Agriculture for more information and to find out how to apply for a grant.

2) Shipper and Distributor Cooperative Marketing Program – helps establish alternative markets for fresh green New Mexico chilies. Provides advertising and promotional services to producers.

∞ This program works with both organic and conventional growers.

3) New Mexico Taste the Tradition Program – a ‘buy New Mexico’ program that provides marketing materials to producers, retailers, and/or processors that signifies products grown or raised in New Mexico.

∞ Sign up to become a member and receive promotional materials electronically or by mail.

∞ ‘Organic’ Labels are available from the NMOCC.

Contact Information:

Ed Avalos – Director of Marketing, Erica Johnson – Administrative Assistant

New Mexico Department of Agriculture

Marketing and Development Division

MSC 5600, PO Box 30005

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4929

Fax: (505) 646-3303

E-mail: ejohnson@nmdamail.nmsu.edu

 

New Mexico Farmers’ Marketing Association

The association promotes direct marketing avenues for NM agricultural products, advocates for the interests and needs of farmers’ markets and direct marketing farmers, educates farmers and consumers about the benefits of direct marketing and the importance of supporting local agriculture and community.

∞ They work with many organic producers.

Contact Information:

320 Aztec St., Suite B

Santa Fe, NM 87501

Sarah Grant

Phone: (505) 983-4010

E-mail: info@farmersmarketsmn.org

Website: www.farmersmarketsnm.org

 

Pueblo of San Felipe Farm Services Program

Provide marketing and technical assistance to farmers in the San Felipe Pueblo. They host a farmers’ market where they hope to encourage small, local farmers to continue and derive an income from their agricultural traditions by providing an easily accessible outlet to sell fresh, naturally grown produce. Traditional agriculture in the San Felipe Pueblo does not use harmful chemicals or pesticides.

Contact Information:

Felice Lucero

PO Box 4339

San Felipe Pueblo, NM

Phone: (505) 867-3381

E-mail: felice54@msn.com

Website: www.puebloofsanfelipe.org

 

Rocky Mountain Farmers Union

RMFU serves the interests of independent family farmers and ranchers throughout Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming by improving the well being of family producers and their communities through legislation, cooperation and education.

∞ The Cooperative Development Center at the RMFU supports organic producer cooperative organizations. Some of the projects they have been involved in include: The New Mexico Front Range Organics Cooperative , The Organic Alfalfa and Feed Grains Cooperative , and several Regional Supply and Delivery Cooperatives for Small Organic Producers.

Contact Information:

Lee Swenson, Director

or Dan Hobbs, Cooperative Development Specialist

5655 S. Yosemite Street, Suite 400

Greenwood Village, CO 80111

Phone: (303) 752-5800

Fax: (303) 752-5810

E-mail: rmfu@rmfu.org

Website: http://www.co-ops.org/

 

Rural Agricultural Improvement and Public Affairs Project – RAIPAP

RAIPAP does rural community development work in four different areas: sustainable agriculture, food processing and marketing, small business development, and organizational and leadership skills. Their clientele are the small-farms and limited-resource ranchers and farmers in this area. They also work with grassroots agricultural organizations and small marketing and entrepreneurial groups.

Contact Information:

Edmund Gomez

Rio Arriba County

PO Box 159

Alcade, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-2668

E-mail: gr@nmsu.edu

 

Sangre de Cristo Agricultural Producers Cooperative

Formed in 1995 with the help of New Mexico State University's Cooperative Extension Service and the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA), it is the goal of the Sangre de Cristo Coop to assist northern New Mexico growers in producing and marketing organic wheat and other products.

Contact Information:

Craig Mapel, NMDA (see above) or

D'Lyn Ford – Agricultural Communication, NMSU

Phone: (505) 646-6528

Fax: (505) 646-3513

E-mail: dlford@nmsu.edu

 

Santa Fe Family Farmers’ Co-op

The Santa Fe Family Farmers’ Coop is a distributor to regional retailers in New Mexico and Colorado of local produce with an emphasis on organic. They deliver primarily to the areas of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and Durango, CO.

∞ They will buy certified or registered organic products.

∞ They serve both members of the cooperative and those who are unaffiliated.

∞ They have a direct-to-consumer food box program, in which they deliver boxes of seasonal produce from co-op producer-members directly to peoples’ homes.

Contact Information:

Martin Connaughton

PO Box 1468

Santa Cruz, NM 87567

Phone: (505) 471-3345

E-mail: comments@santafefarmers.com

Website: www.santafefarmers.com

 

Southwest Marketing Network

The goal of the SWMN is to ensure that new, existing, and prospective Southwest producers – especially small-scale, alternative, and minority producers – have the connections with others, technical and financial assistance, marketing information, business and marketing skills, and peer examples needed to improve their marketing success as a means to improve their profitability, viability, and success. They support and facilitate conferences, newsletters, and training sessions.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Project Director

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

Website: http://www.swmarketing.ncat.org/

 

Taos County Economic Development Center – Commercial Kitchen

The development center offers an up-to-code food-processing kitchen as a great way to give small, and organic, food processing enterprises a way to test feasibility of products before making a large, capital investment.

Contact Information:

Tori Brown, Teri Bad Hand, Patti Martinson

TCEDC Business Park

1021 Salazar Rd.

PO Box 1389

Taos, NM 87571

Phone: (505) 758-8731

Fax: (505) 758-3201

Website: http://www.laplaza.org/business/tcedc/

 

 

___________________________________________

Educational and Research Services:

 

Alcalde Sustainable Agriculture Science Center

The center is dedicated to research about water management and sustainable agriculture to benefit small family farms and ranches of north central New Mexico.

∞ They have 6 certified organic acres where they run tests and collect information on organic fruit and medicinal herb production.

∞ Host field days to exhibit research being conducted around the state.

∞ Conduct hands-on workshops to teach small family farmers and ranchers basic agricultural skills.

Contact Information:

Ronald Walser – Research Scientist, organic production

P.O. Box 159

369 Alcalde Street

Alcalde, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-4241

Fax: (505) 852-2857

E-mail: rwalser@nmsu.edu

Website: http://alcaldesc.nmsu.edu

 

 

 

Climate Center

The New Mexico Climate Center provides information about climate, crop water use, and insect development using growing degree-days.

∞ Their home page has a search engine for climatic information in New Mexico.

Contact Information:

Ted Sammis, Director/State Climatologist

Phone: (505) 646-2104

John Belcher, Automated Weather Station Technician

Department of Agronomy and Horticulture

Box 30001, Dept. 3Q

Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003

Phone: (505) 646-5082

Fax: (505) 646-6041

Email: webmaster@weather.nmsu.edu

 

Farm to School Program

All schools within the state of New Mexico may receive local produce as part of the ‘Department of Defense (DoD) Fresh Program’ program. Apples, watermelon, potatoes, green chilies, and tomatoes are all locally produced items that have been supplied to New Mexico schools based on availability. In addition, schools within the Santa Fe Public School System, Taos Public Schools, and the Albuquerque Public School District receive local produce directly from local farmers.

∞ The Farm to School Project can be accessed through Farm to Table’s Farm to School Program. It is also associated with the Cooking with Kids Program and other nutrition and agricultural education programs.

∞ Items of special interest are: Fruit and vegetables for school breakfast, lunch and snack menus.

Contact Information:

Le Adams and Pam Roy, Farm to Table (see below) and

Craig Mapel

Marketing Specialist

New Mexico Department of Agriculture

MSC 3189 Box 30005

Las Cruces, NM 88003-8005

Phone: (505) 852-3088

E-mail: cmapel@la-tierra.com

 

Farm to Table, Inc.

A New Mexico based non-profit organization that works to develop farm to school efforts in New Mexico. A unique program to introduce fresh local (organic) produce into schools, takes kids on field trips to farms and other related venues, showcases farmers in classrooms, and runs hands-on activities for children at the local farmers’ market.

∞ Contact Le to get connected to the local school market.

Contact Information:

Le Adams and Pam Roy

Farm to Table

3900 Paseo Del Sol

Santa Fe, NM 87507

Phone: (505) 473-1004

Fax: (505) 424-1144

E-mail: ladams@cybermesa.com , pamelaroy@aol.com

 

New Mexico Food and Agricultural Policy Council

The New Mexico Food and Agriculture Policy Council (NMFAPC), initiated through citizen-based, grassroots activism, is a vehicle to work with public and private entities towards strengthening all of New Mexico’s access to sufficient, high-quality food; strengthening the economy of New Mexico’s ranches, farms, and value-adding food processors.

Contact Information:

Le Adams and Pam Roy

Farm to Table

3900 Paseo Del Sol

Santa Fe, NM 87507

Phone: (505) 473-1004

Fax: (505) 424-1144

E-mail: ladams@cybermesa.com , pamelaroy@aol.com

 

OASIS – Organic Agriculture Students Inspiring Sustainability

OASIS is the first student managed organic garden on the Las Cruces NMSU campus, the first organic production class, and the first Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) venture in the Mesilla Valley.

∞ They welcome questions from organic farmers in NM with questions about starting up CSA programs.

Contact Information:

Connie Falk

Department of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business

Box 30003, MSC 3169

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4731

E-mail: cfalk@nmsu.edu

Website: http://agecon.nmsu.edu/oasis

 

Quivira Coalition

The purpose of the Quivira Coalition is to teach ranchers, environmentalists, public land managers, and other members of the public that ecologically healthy rangeland and economically robust ranches can be compatible.

∞ They disseminate knowledge through organized meetings and on individual basis about grass-fed, sustainable, and organic ranching principles.

Contact Information:

Courtney White and Barbara Johnson

1413 Second Street, Suite 1

Santa Fe, NM 87505

Phone: (505) 820-2544

E-mail: executive@quiviracoalition.org

Website: www.quiviracoalition.org

 

Seed Certification - New Mexico Crop Improvement Association

The New Mexico Crop Improvement Association (NMCIA) manages seed certification programs in the state. The agency is responsible for the promulgation of rules, regulations, and the standards for all certification of seed and other propagating materials in the state. NMCIA-certified seed is guaranteed to meet minimum standards for cleanliness and germination rate.

∞ They work with a few organic producers to supply untreated seed. PRODUCERS WANTING ORGANIC CERTIFICATION OF THEIR SEED MUST, in addition, apply for organic certification from a USDA-Accredited Certifier.

∞ They sell all foundation seed for the state of NM, including Cotton, Chile, Peanut, Onion; or any other type of seed the producer wants certified.

∞ Call to become a member.

Contact Information:

MSC 3CI-NMSU

Rm. 296, Gerald Thomas Building, NMSU

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4125

Fax: (505) 646-8137

Website: http://www.nmsu.edu/~nmcia

 

Tribal Extension Task Force – NMSU

The Tribal Extension initiative was started in 2004 to establish at least 8 tribal extension centers throughout New Mexico. They are currently in the process of seeking funding support from the USDA and other federal and state agencies and would like to get some support from private foundations. At each of the centers, they hope to provide services to all 22 tribes and pueblos in New Mexico in the following four areas: (1) agriculture, natural resources, and ranching, (2) implementing 4-H Clubs, (3) Family Education Services in areas related to nutrition, health, home economics, and financial planning, and (4) Youth Leadership Development and Family violence prevention programs.

∞ They currently work with some tribal farm services programs that are situated on reservations and hope to do more work with other tribes once they obtain more funding for their initiative.

Contact Information:

Samuel Suina, Director

6655 Vooscane Ave.

Cochiti, NM 87083

Phone: (505) 231-0616

E-mail: samuelsuina@msn.com

 

 


 

Organic Businesses:

 

Cervantes Enterprises, Inc.

Cervantes purchases organic chiles from New Mexico producers, which they process to create a chile mash or sauce which is then wholesaled to producers who make the final product.

Contact Information:

Dino Cervantes, Owner

PO Box 158

La Mesa, NM 88044

Phone: (505) 233-3148

E-mail: dinoc@ceinm.com

 

e – Plaza

e-Plaza ‘was first envisioned by a few local farmers, agricultural organizations, and NM Cooperative Extension staff members as a means of sharing information with the agricultural community spread across the mountains and valleys of New Mexico.’

∞ e-Plaza is an on-line service that allows many organic and small, alternative agricultural producers in Northern New Mexico to:

∞ Communicate by reading and posting events and news,

∞ List their farm or ranch in the directory,

∞ Find & post links to external web sites,

∞ Buy & sell products,

∞ Discuss local issues and agricultural techniques,

∞ Archive meeting notes to share with others, and

∞ Create a web site to market agricultural products.

Contact Information:

E-mail: cmccandless@rdcnm.org

Website: http://www.e-plaza.org

 

Farm Connection

Publishes ‘The Farm Connection’, which is an information exchange for New Mexico farmers and farm communities, supporting environmentally sound, economically workable, and socially just agriculture.

Contact Information:

Lynda Prim

PO Box 447

Dixon, NM 87527

E-mail: lprim@restingintheriver.com

 

Mesa Farmers’ Cooperative

The Mesa Farmers’ Cooperative contracts their services to gin organic cotton. They are a certified organic processing facility.

Contact Information:

Albert Pando

PO Box 646

Mesquite, NM 88044

Phone: (505) 233-3112

E-mail: dosi@zianet.com

 

Seed Vendors – of Organic Seed

1) Seeds of Change

Organic flowers, herbs, vegetables, cover crops

Contact Information:

P.O. Box 15700

Santa Fe, NM 87506

Phone: 1-888-762-7333 (orders)

E-mail: gardener@seedsofchange.com

Website: www.seedsofchange.com

 

Tex-Mex Chili Spice

Tex-Mex Chile Spice, located in Santa Teresa, contracts their services to mill organic chile from New Mexico producers in order to create certified organic chile powder.

Contact Information:

Roy Ramos

2750 Airport Rd., Suite 100

Santa Teresa, NM 88008

Phone: (505) 598-2923

 

 


 

Publications:

The publications in this list have been selected from NMSU Department, Cooperative Extension, and Experiment Station archive. They include articles written by NMSU faculty and affiliates, grant-funded publications, and Cooperative Extension fact sheets. They contain information relative to organic production: organic and niche marketing strategies; soil and water quality concerns and testing; and information about composting and manure management, vegetable and fruit production, weed management, irrigation, and (integrated) pest management.

The publications were reviewed for their relevancy to organic production issues, however, may still contain information that is not necessarily compliant with the USDA’s National Organic Standards. For specific questions about organic compliance, contact Brett Bakker at the New Mexico Organic Commodity Commission, phone: (505) 841-9067, e-mail: brett.bakker@state.nm.us .

Many of NMSU’s extension publications are available as PDF files. To use files in PDF format, you will need the Adobe Acrobat Reader , which is free to download from the Adobe web site.

Many of the publications are viewable on the Web, but there are several print publications that can be ordered using an online order form . For more details, view NMSU’s General Order Information . http://cahe.nmsu.edu/pubs/puborder_form.html

 

 

Soil Quality and Testing

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

A-137: Soil Analysis: A Key to Soil Nutrient

A-138: Taking Good Soil Samples for Efficient Plant Growth and Water Use

A-139: Identifying Nutrient Deficiencies for Efficient Plant Growth and Water Use

A-140: Soil Salinity and Sodicity Limits Efficient Plant Growth and Water Use

A-141: Interpreting Soil Tests for Efficient Plant Growth and Water Use

A-142: Useful Soil Testing for Efficient Water Use by Plants

A-122: Soil Test Interpretations

A-107: Managing Saline Soils

A-114: Test Your Soil

A-118: Use Naturally Available Amendments for Sodic Soils

 

Weeds

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

Circular 522 Considerations for Prescribed Burning

 

Livestock and Poultry

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

Circular 477 How to Keep a Small Poultry Flock

 

Irrigation

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

A-102: Measuring Irrigation Water With a Flow Meter

A-103: Measuring Irrigation Water With a Parshall Flume

A-104: Estimating Water Flow From Pipes

A-116: Irrigation Water Classification Systems

Circular 494: Irrigated Pastures for New Mexico

A-119: Design Considerations for Drip Irrigation

B-810: Sizing Plastic Pipelines for Water on the Range

Field and Cover Crops

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

A-129: Nitrogen Fixation By Legumes

A-130: Inoculation of Legumes

 

Pest Management

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

Guide H-150: Organic Gardening -- Natural Insecticides

A-606: Biological Pest Control Programs in New Mexico

 

 


 

New Mexico State University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and Marketing of Organic Products:

The faculty and staff in this list have been selected from employees of the land grant University system in New Mexico. They have been identified as those who have expertise and interest in the production and marketing of organic products.

 

1. Gerald Chacon

NM Cooperative Extension

∞ Supervises 13 county and 3 tribal Extension programs

∞ Head of the NM Small Farm Extension Task Force

Contact Information:

120 South Federal, Room 109

Santa Fe, NM 87501

Phone: (505) 983-4615

Fax: (505) 983-4636

E-mail: gchacon@nmsu.edu

 

2. Dr. Joe Ellington

Professor of Entomology, NMSU

∞ Organic production

∞ Biological control

Contact Information:

New Mexico State University

Gerald Thomas Room 226

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-2037

E-mail: joelling@nmsu.edu

 

 

3. Constance Falk

Professor, Agricultural Economics & Director of OASIS: Organic Agriculture Students Inspiring Sustainability; an NMSU CSA class and project

∞ Agricultural Marketing of Organics, Sustainable Agriculture, Economic Development, Farm Markets, International Development Projects, and Computer Applications for Agriculture.

∞ Dr. Falk teaches: World Food Problems and Managing a Community Supported Farm through the Honors Program, Mastering Financial Statements, a Spring Break Study Tour to Latin America through the AEAB department and an Organic Vegetable Production class in conjuction with the Horticulture Department.

∞ Her research interests are cooperative development, the economics of small scale farming, Community Supported Agriculture, organic agriculture, and feasibility analysis of value added agriculture. Her current research project is the establishment of a student run organic Community Supported Agriculture farm on campus.

Contact Information:

Department of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business

MSC 3169 Box 30003

New Mexico State University

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4731

E-mail: cfalk@nmsu.edu

 

4. Natalie P Goldberg

NMSU – Cooperative Extension Service

∞ Nematode Specialist

Contact Information:

PO Box 30003, MSC 3AE

Las Cruces NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-1621

E-mail: ngoldber@nmsu.edu

Website: http://www.cahe.nmsu.edu/ces/

 

5. Edmund Gomez

Project Manager for the Rural Agricultural Improvement Program

Contact Information:

PO Box 159

Alcade, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-2668

E-mail: gr@nmsu.edu

 

6. Del Jimenez

Cooperative Extension State Specialist, RAIPAP

∞ Assists growers making the transition to organic production

∞ Facilitates state wide workshops on organic production

∞ RAIPAP, Agricultural Specialist

∞ He helps farmers make the most of their resources by setting up on-farm demonstrations using the latest research information.

∞ He currently runs more than 50 such projects that show first-hand such information as new vegetable and pasture grass varieties, and grazing and fencing techniques.

Contact Information:

PO Box 159

369 Alcalde Street

Alcalde, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-2668

Fax: (505) 852-2857

E-mail: djimenez@nmsu.edu

 

7. Dr. Charles Martin

Specialist, Sustainable Agriculture Science Center at Alcalde

∞ Doing research and providing workshops for New Mexico organic fruit and medicinal herb producers

∞ Working to set up a growers' association

Contact Information:

PO Box 159

369 Alcalde Street

Alcalde, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-4241

E-mail: cmartin@nmsu.edu

 

8. Stephen H. Thomas

NMSU – Department of Entomology Plant Pathology and Weed Science

∞ Nematode Specialist

Contact Information:

PO Box 30003, MSC 3BE

Las Cruces NM 88003

Phone: 505-646-2321

Fax: 505-646-8087

E-mail: stthomas@nmsu.edu

Website: http://taipan.nmsu.edu/eppws/

 

9. Stephanie Walker

State Extension SARE Coordinator

Contact Information:

Extension and Plant Sciences Department

New Mexico State University

MSC 3AE, Box 30003

Las Cruces, NM 88003

Phone: (505) 646-4398

Fax: (505) 646-8085

E-mail: swalker@nmsu.edu

 

10. Ronald Walser

Research Scientist, Alcalde Sustainable Agriculture Science Center

∞ Organic production of fruits and medicinal herbs

Contact Information:

P.O. Box 159

369 Alcalde Street

Alcalde, NM 87511

Phone: (505) 852-4241

Fax: (505) 852-2857

E-mail: rwalser@nmsu.edu

Website: http://alcaldesc.nmsu.edu

 

 

 


 

UTAH

 


 

State Organic Producer Organizations:

None at this time.

 

 


 

USDA-Accredited Organic Certifiers in Utah:

 

Utah Department of Food and Agriculture’s Organic Certification Program

This program is intended to serve producers, processors and consumers of agricultural products. The goal is to manage a process that will maintain the integrity of food products produced without the use of restricted chemical inputs. Specific information for the organic food program should be directed to:

Contact Information:

Seth R. Winterton

Organic Coordinator

Agriculture Investigator

Utah Dept. of Agriculture

350 North Redwood Road

P.O. Box 146500

Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6500

Phone: (801) 538-7141

Fax: (801) 538-7189

Pager: 801-241-2173

E-mail: sethwinterton@utah.gov

Website: http://www.ag.state.ut.us/plantind/organic.html

 

 

Independent Organic Certifying Agents and Organizations

For a list of accredited independent certifiers who have certified/inspected organic farms in the Four Corner region please see page 5.

 

Northern Utah Organic Growers

Since 1992, provides organic certification and inspection services for producers, handlers, packers, and processors, under OCIA’s standards and accreditation. Also, a good resource for organic production information.

Contact Information:

Martha Franks

P.O. Box 97

Tremonton UT 84337

Phone: (435) 257-3976

E-mail: taylorfarms@efortress.com

 

 

 


Analytical Laboratories:

The following analytical laboratories are listed because they are convenient for producers in the region. They each perform basic soil, water, and plant testing, all of which address agricultural needs, but may fall short of specific in-depth analyses sought by organic producers.

 

Further analyses may be outsourced to labs which perform cutting edge testing specific to organic production needs. These labs are found on page 9 of this guide.

 

 

Albion Labs

Performs complete analyses of plant tissue, soil, and irrigation water. For a description of how to package and send a soil sample see:

http://www.albion-an.com/plant/archivetopic.htm , article titled: ‘Managing Soils to Optimize Crop Production’.

Contact Information:

Kevin Dickinson

Albion Advanced Nutrition

101 North Main St.

Clearfield, UT 84015

Phone, Toll-free: (866) 243-5283

E-mail: kdickinson@albion-an.com

Website: www.albion-an.com

 

Central Analytical Laboratory

Utah State University Analytical Lab

∞ Soil test cost: $10. Includes: pH, salinity, P, K, texture and recommendations. To submit sample: Contact your local county extension office or the lab.

Common regional problems: High salinity.

Contact Information:

Jan Kotuby-Amacher

166 Ag. Science Bldg, Room 166

4830 Old Main Hill

Logan, UT 84322-4830

Phone: (435) 797-2217

Fax: (435) 797-2117

E-mail: Jkotuby@mendel.usu.edu

Website: www.usual.usu.edu

 

Intermountain Herbarium

The mission of the Intermountain Herbarium is to serve as a primary source of information on the flora and fungi of the Intermountain region, both native and introduced and to foster increased understanding and appreciation of the floristic diversity of the Intermountain Region.

Contact Information:

Mary Barkworth , Director

Michael B. Piep , Assistant Curator

Intermountain Herbarium

Utah State University

5305 Old Main Hill

Logan, Utah 84322-5305

Phone: (435) 797-1484, or (435) 797-0061

E-mail: Mary@biology.usu.edu , Michael@biology.usu.edu

 

Plant Clinic

Plant Pest Diagnostic Lab.

Contact Information:

Julie Jenkins, Plant Disease Dignostician and Alan Roe

Department of Biology

Utah State University

Logan, UT 84322-5305

Phone: (435) 797-2435

Fax: (435) 797-1575

Email: jjenkins@biology.usu.edu , or alanr@biology.usu.edu

Website: http://extension.usu.edu/plantpath

 

Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory

The purpose of the laboratory is to provide timely, in-depth, cost efficient, veterinary diagnostic services to safeguard animal health, protect the agricultural economy, and shield the public against zoonoses (diseases transmissible from animals to humans).

Contact Information:

950 East 1400 North Logan UT 84322-5700 Phone: (435) 797-1895 Fax: (435) 797-2805 E-mail: uvdl@cc.usu.edu

 


 

Marketing Services:

 

Southwest Marketing Network

The goal of the SWMN is to ensure that new, existing, and prospective Southwest producers – especially small-scale, alternative, and minority producers – have the connections with others, technical and financial assistance, marketing information, business and marketing skills, and peer examples needed to improve their marketing success as a means to improve their profitability, viability, and success. They support and facilitate conferences, newsletters, and training sessions.

Contact Information:

Jim Dyer, Project Co-Coordinator

2727 CR 134

Hesperus, CO 81326

Phone: (970) 588-2292

E-mail: jadyer@frontier.net

Website: www.swmarketing.ncat.org

 

Utah Department of Food and Agriculture’s Marketing Division: Farmers Markets

Farmers’ markets are a great way for producers, particularly small local farmers who use pesticide-free or organic growing methods, to sell their products directly to consumers around the state. To find out how to participate, or for more information, contact:

Contact Information:

Utah Department of Agriculture’s Marketing Division

Richard Sparks

Deputy Director of Marketing, Utah Dept. of Agriculture

PO Box 146500

350 N. Redwood Rd.

Salt Lake City, UT 84224-6500

Phone: (801) 538-7108

E-mail: rsparks@utah.gov

 

 


 

Educational and Research Services:

 

The Diversified Agriculture Conference

The Diversified Agricultural Conference, sponsored by Utah State Cooperative Extension, is designed to benefit agriculture producers who are interested in more than just traditional agriculture, including recreation, tourism, direct marketing, farmers’ markets, further processing, etc. The annual conference features a great deal of subject matter relative to organic production and marketing. If you have questions or want to be contacted with registration and other conference information as it becomes available, contact:

Contact Information:

Dan Drost

Phone: (435) 797-2258

Fax: (435) 797-3376

E-mail: dand@ext.usu.edu

Phone: (435) 797-1533

or Ruby Ward

Phone: (435) 797-2323

Fax: (435) 797-2701

E-mail: rward@econ.usu.edu

Website: http://extension.usu.edu/cooperative/agribusiness/index.cfm/cid.371/tid.762

 

Utah Food and Agricultural Policy Council

The Utah Food and Agriculture Policy Council is a vehicle to work with public and private entities towards strengthening all of Utah’s access to sufficient, high-quality food; strengthening the economy of Utah’s ranches, farms, and value-adding food processors.

Contact Information:

Richard Sparks

PO Box 146500

350 N. Redwood Road

Salt Lake City, UT 84224-6500

E-mail: rsparks@utah.gov

 

Wasatch Community Gardens

Provides youth education programs, tend a community garden, and are beginning to work on ‘farm to cafeteria’ (direct marketing local agricultural products to schools and food banks).

Contact Information:

Laura Ploplys

245 E 400 South St., Suite 204

Salt Lake City, UT 84111

Phone: (801) 322-4810

E-mail: youth@wasatchgardens.org

Website: http://www.wasatchgardens.org/

 

Western Region Sustainable Agriculture & Research Education (SARE)/ Utah State University

SARE is a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that functions through competitive grants conducted cooperatively by farmers, ranchers, researchers and agricultural professionals to advance farm and ranch systems that are profitable, environmentally sound and good for communities.

∞ The Western SARE puts out a call to area sustainable and organic producers to submit grant proposals each year. They also provide information and answer questions relative to sustainable and organic agriculture.

∞ Each state in the western region has a SARE coordinator.

Contact Information:

Robert Newhall

Plants, Soils & Biometerology Department

UMC 4820

Logan, UT 84322-4820

Phone: (435) 797-2183

Fax: (435) 797-2117

E-mail: bobn@ext.usu.edu

Website: http://wsare.usu.edu

 

Youth Garden Project

Provides experiential education programs for youth by teaching the value of growing an organic garden and consuming a healthy diet.

Contact Information:

Cari Militano

530 S. 400 St.

Moab, UT 84532

Phone: 9435) 259-2326

E-mail: carimilitano@youthgardenproject.org

Website: www.youthgardenproject.org

 

 


 

Organic Businesses:

 

Live Earth Products

Mines and manufactures quality humate products.

Contact Information:

Dave Taylor or Trudy Lund

PO Box 76

Emery, UT 84522

 

 


 

Publications:

The publications in this list have been selected from Utah State University (USU) Agriculture Department, Cooperative Extension, and Experiment Station archive. They include articles written by USU faculty and affiliates, grant-funded publications, and Cooperative Extension fact sheets. They contain information relative to organic production: organic and niche marketing strategies; soil and water quality concerns and testing; and information about composting and manure management, vegetable and fruit production, weed management, irrigation, and (integrated) pest management.

The publications were reviewed for their relevancy to organic production issues, however, may still contain information that is not necessarily compliant with the USDA’s National Organic Standards. For specific questions about organic compliance, contact Seth Winterton at the Utah Department of Food and Agriculture, phone: (801) 538-7141, e-mail: sethwinterton@utah.gov.

Many of USU’s extension publications are available as PDF files at: http://extension.usu.edu/cooperative/publications/ . To use files in PDF format, you will need the Adobe Acrobat Reader , which is free to download from the Adobe web site.

 

Composting

1) Koenig, R. The Role of Composting and Soil and Manure Testing in Comprehensive Nutrient Management of Planning. 2002.

 

2) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AGWM-01 The Composting Process

 

Soil Quality and Testing

1) Satter, L.D. Meeting Phosphorous Requirements in an Environmentally Responsible Way. 2002.

 

2) Cox, L., Koenig, R. II. High pH (alkaline soil). 2003

 

3) Johnson, M., Koenig, R. III. Drainage. 2003

 

4) Koenig, R., Cerny, T. IV. Soil Structure. 2003

 

5) Heaton, K, Koenig, R. V. Low Organic Matter. 2003

 

6) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

HG 512 Understanding Your Soil Test Report

HG-510: Selecting and Using Organic Fertilizers

AG 282 Diagnostic Testing for Nitrogen Soil Fertility

AG 275 Managing Sodic Soils in Utah

AG-SO-07 Managing Soil pH in Utah

AG-SO-03 Salinity and Plant Tolerance

AG 283 Urea: Low Cost Fertilizer

AG/Soils/2003-01 I. High Salinity (Soluble Salts)

 

Weeds

1) Evans, E.W. Biological Control Agents for Utah Weeds: Ceutorhynchus litura, a Stem-mining Weevil of Canada Thistle. 1993.

 

2) Evans, E.W. Biological Control Agents for Utah Weeds: The Knapweed Seedhead Gall Flies. 1993.

 

3) Evans, E.W. Biological Control Agents for Utah Weeds: The Musk Thistle Weevil. 1993.

 

4) Evans, E.W. Biological Control of Weeds through Introduced Insects. 1993.

 

Trees, Small Fruits, and Nuts

1) Alston, D., Fallahi, E., Gaus, A., Hatch, T., Jensen, D., Reding, M., Seeley, S., Valdez, T., Zimmerman, R. Sustainable Orchard Management.

 

2) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

Analytical Testing

AG-FG-02 Soil, Water, and Plant Tissue Testing in Utah Orchards

 

Livestock and Poultry

1) Barnhill, J., Olsen, S., Sessions, R., Miner, D., Niels Hansen, T., Garn, C., Koenig, R., Whitesides, R. Small Pasture Management Guide for Utah. 1999.

 

2) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AG/Sheep/2004-01 Sheep and Goats, Ecological Tools for the 21st Century

AGWM-04 Manure Best Management Practices: A Practical Guide for Dairies in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico

 

Irrigation

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AG 289 Assuring a Long-Term Ground Water Supply

BIE/WM-02 Energy Conservation with Irrigation Water Management

BIE/WM-37 Garden Water Use in Utah

BIE/WM-04 How Good is your Water Measurement?

BBIE/WM-03 How Well Does your Irrigation Well Hold Water?

BIE/WM-07-34 Sprinklers, Crop Water Use, and Irrigation Time - … County (Each number contains specific information for a particular county in Utah.)

 

Field and Cover Crops

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

HG 522 Cover Crops for Utah Gardens

 

Integrated Pest Management

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

AG/IPM/01 The Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Concept

AG/IPM/02 Important Components of a Successful Pest Management Program

AG/IPM/03 Pest Management Decision-Making: The Economic-injury Level

AG/IPM/04 General Concepts of Biological Control

 

Other Useful Publications

1) Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets:

Fact Sheet No. 79 What are the Indirect Costs of Pesticide Use?

 

 


 

Utah State University Faculty and Staff with Interests in the Production and Marketing of Organic Products:

The faculty and staff in this list have been selected from employees of the land grant University system in Utah. They have been identified as those who have expertise and interest in the production and/or marketing of organic products.

 

1. Diane Alston

State Extension Entomology Specialist

Associate Professor: Department of Biology

∞ State Integrated Pest Management Coordinator

∞ Sustainable Orchard Management

∞ Development and validation of biorational technologies for key horticultural pests on tree fruits, vegetables, and woody ornamentals

Contact Information:

Biology Department

BNR 231 (Lab BNR 210)

Logan, UT 84322

Phone: (435) 797-2516

E-mail: dianea@biology.usu.edu

Website: http://www.biology.usu.edu/people/facultyinfo.asp?username=dianea

 

2. DeeVon Bailey

Professor of Economics

∞ Direct Marketing of livestock and State-branded products

Contact Information:

Department of Economics

Utah State University

Logan, UT 84322-3530

Phone: (435) 797-2316

Fax: (435) 797-2701

E-mail: deevonb@ext.usu.edu

 

 

3. Dan Drost

State Extension Vegetable Specialist

Professor of Horticulture; Department of Plants, Soils, and Biotechnology Project Leader: Sustainable Vegetable Production Systems

∞ Improvements in water and nutrient management using organic techniques

Contact Information:

310 Agricultural Sciences Building Utah State University

Logan, UT 84322-4820 Phone: (435) 797-2258

Fax: (435) 797-3376

E-mail: dand@ext.usu.edu

Website: http://www.agx.usu.edu/people/researchers/vita/?alpha=D&idp=172

 

4. Dr. Kent Evans

State Extension Plant Pathologist

Assistant Professor: Department of Biology

Contact Information:

Biology Department

BNR 243 (Lab BNR 238)

Logan, UT 84322

Phone: (435) 797-2504

E-mail: ckevans@cc.usu.edu

 

5. Mike Johnson

County Director, Grand County Cooperative Extension

∞ Organic Soil Amendments

Contact Information:

125 West 200 South Moab, UT 84532

Phone: (435) 259-7558

E-mail: michealj@ext.usu.edu

Website: http://extension.usu.edu/cooperative/grand/index.cfm/cid.1154/

 

6. Robert Newhall

State Extension SARE Coordinator

∞ Sustainable and organic agriculture production methods

∞ Small grains, corn, green manures, cover crops, natural resource protection

Contact Information:

Plants, Soils & Biometerology Department

UMC 4820

Logan, UT 84322-4820

Phone: (435) 797-2183

Fax: (435) 797-2117

E-mail: bobn@ext.usu.edu

 

7. Shawn Steffan

Integrated Pest Management Project Leader

Contact Information:

Department of Biology

BNR 203

Logan, UT 84322-5305

Phone: (435) 797-0776

E-mail: steffan@biology.usu.edu

 

8. Ruby Ward

Agricultural Economist

∞ Agribusiness Management, Operations Research, and Decision Making at the Firm Level

∞ She is in economics, accounting, management, and finance in research, extension, and teaching. Her work focuses primarily on those concepts needed by agribusiness owners in planning for the long-run viability of their business.

Contact Information:

Department of Economics

Utah State University

3530 Old Main Hill

Logan, UT 84322-3530

Phone: (435) 797-2323

Fax: (435) 797-2701

E-mail: rward@econ.usu.edu

Website: http://www.econ.usu.edu/People/ward.aspx

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

 

Ford, D. (2001). Organic Wheat Growers’ Coop Boosts Income for Northern New Mexico Farmers. Retrieved March, 12, 2005, http://spectre.nmsu.edu/media/news2.lasso?i=28

 

Friedman, D. (2001). Introduction to Organic Farming. Beltsville, MD: Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) Program.

 

Kimbrell, A. (2002). The Fatal Harvest Reader: The Tragedy of Industrial Agriculture. Sausalito: The Foundation for Deep Ecology.

 

Taylor, N. (1999). Organic Resource Manual. Olympia: Washington State Department of Agriculture.

 

White, C., Widner, J. (2000). Profile of Good Stewardship: Mark Cortner. The Quivira Coalition, 3(3).