Community Food Projects Grant Recipients in the Four Corners States (2000-2007)

The following descriptions of Community Food Projects Grant recipients in the Four Corners states include project goals or summaries and project updates. The information for the project goals and summaries was collected from the websites of the World Hunger Year and the USDA CSREES. The project updates were collected from the organizations directly and the organization’s websites.

 

Arizona Community Food Projects:

Hopi Community Food Project (2001)

Hopi Pu'tavi Project, Inc.

Second Mesa, AZ

FY 2001 grantee, funded at $35,000 for two years

 

Project goal: To produce viable economic options related to locally grown foods that are culturally compatible in a society where food is essentially significant in community life, both culturally and ceremonially. The project will focus on producing a business plan for a corn grinding business and develop a plan for the Hopi Tribe to form a Department of Agriculture to assist Hopi farmers.

 

World Hunger Year Report: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21038

 

Project Update: In lieu of not receiving the full amount of grant dollars requested from the CFP, the Hopi Community Food Project changed its focus slightly. The group decided to spend the grant money conducting a survey of farmers on the Hopi Reservation to evaluate the status of traditional agriculture on the reservation. The survey was conducted to help better inform future community food projects. Eight Hopi individuals were hired and trained to do the surveys. This included helping to develop the survey instrument and the database. They also participated in analyzing the results. They were able to collect 77 interviews of farmers across the Hopi Reservation. The survey was completed in 2004.

*Update gathered from Matthew Livingston on 1/6/08.

 

 

Tohono O'odham Community Action (2001)

Tohono O'odham Community Food System - Phase II

Sells, AZ

$135,000

 

Project Goal: This project will provide a follow-up to and expansion of activities conducted as part of a fiscal year 1997 CFP grant received by the grantee. The goals of the food system effort are to create culturally appropriate, agriculturally based economic development, reduce the incidence and severity of diabetes among Tribal members, and revitalize traditional cultural practices. Strategies for accomplishing these goals include: food production through development of a farm, equipment cooperative, seed bank, and home gardens; food processing of traditional foods; food distribution via a farmstand, farmers' market, and institutional purchases; development of educational materials that emphasize production and consumption of traditional foods; and the re-establishment of traditional songs, stories, and ceremonies.

 

World Hunger Year Report: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/2

 

Project Update: The 2001 Community Food Grant helped Tohono O'odham Community Action to initially launch several of their programs that serve to increase access to culturally appropriate foods. Many of the programs that began with the FY01 CFPG funding are still in existence today. The 2001 CFPG helped to develop educational materials, hire local workers for their farm, design packaging for farm products, and essentially help to begin efforts to increase the availability of local, culturally appropriate foods.

 

The organization is currently working to increase the access of local, culturally appropriate foods to local schools, hospitals and museums. They are also working with the local community college to develop courses on the preparation and cultivation of traditional foods.

 

For more information about the current work of the Tohono O'odham Community Action organization, please visit their website: http://www.tocaonline.org/

*Update gathered over the phone from Terrol Dew Johnson on 1/7/08.

 

 

Navajo Agricultural Technology Empowerment Center (2002)

Developing Innovations in Navajo Education

Flagstaff, AZ

FY 2002 grantee funded at $230,000 for three years

 

Project goal: This project seeks to combat the high incidence of poverty and unemployment in the Navajo Nation by establishing a Center to address community food security issues. The project will increase the availability of locally grown foods to assist needy community members, help in the rediscovery of a traditional Navajo diet and lifestyle, and provide interactive, online agricultural education and job opportunities.

 

World Hunger Year Report: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21022

 

Project Update: The Navajo Agricultural Technology Empowerment Center was effectively developed by Developing Innovations in Navajo Education. To learn more about the work of the Navajo Nation Traditional Agriculture Outreach project, please visit: http://nntao.org/index.html

*Update gathered from Kyril Calsoyas on 1/9/08.



Linking Food and Water to Benefit Communities in Grand Canyon Country (2003)

Flagstaff, AZ

FY03 grantee funded at $196,000 for two years

 

Project Goal: The project will establish a food and water council to serve a four-county area of Northern Arizona near the Grand Canyon in which community food security is linked to the availability of water, due to frequent local drought conditions. The effort will aid small-scale producers making more efficient and sustainable use of water and food resources and enhance local direct marketing, farm products, from a food directory to development of an eco-label and local advertising.

 

World Hunger Year Project Description: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/60

 

Project Update: Since 2000, the Center for Sustainable Environments has been working with local farmers, ranchers, markets, and restaurants to promote local food production and use. Recently, with the addition of a USDA grant for local marketing initiatives, CSE has begun to implement strategic marketing practices to help promote local farm products, from a food directory to development of an eco-label and local advertising. The grant has helped the "Canyon Country Fresh" project of the NAU Center for Sustainable Environments. For more information about CSE's work on the Canyon Country Fresh project, please visit: http://www.environment.nau.edu/ccf/index.htm

*Update gathered from the NAU Center for Sustainable Environments' website on 1/8/08.



Hopi Community Food System Restoration (2004)

Hopi Foundation/Natwanti Coalition

Hotevilla, AZ

FY04 grantee funded at $161,212 for two years

 

Project Goal: In order to combat epidemic diabetes and obesity and to improve health and well-being among the Hopi people, the project will restore the local food system through expanding a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program, revitalize traditional terrace gardens and farming practices to increase the food supply, and conduct a community food assessment.

 

World Hunger Year Project Description: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/66

 

Project Update: The Hopi Community Food System Restoration project has effectively used their CFPG funding to develop several projects which include; a youth farming project to educate youth about traditional agricultural methods (now in its third year), the restoration of an ancestral terrace garden complex (fixed irrigation and replanted terraces), a pilot farmers' market (ran for two years) and a community food assessment. The Hopi Community Food System Restoration project conducted and completed a community food assessment which interviewed 419 people for the assessment. The organization received a one year extension of their Community Food Project.

*Update gathered from Andrew Lewis of the Natwani Coalition on 1/8/08.



Navajo Nation Traditional Agriculture Outreach (2007)

Developing Innovations in Navajo Education, Inc.

Winslow, AZ

Funded at $299,700 for three years

 

Project goal: The project will seek to meet the expressed needs of seven chapter houses located in the Western and Fort Defiance Agencies of the Navajo Nation for sustainable agricultural development, business development skill training, and value-added food production and marketing support. The project communities, all within northern Arizona, range from Flagstaff to the Hopi Nation. The project will leverage chapter house capital resources, Navajo Nation and U.S. government resources, universities, and expertise from a variety of other highly experienced non-profit agriculture and business development assistance organizations to help achieve long-term sustainable food system goals, agriculturally-based economic opportunities, and high quality foods for local consumption.

 

CSREES Project Description: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/cfp/pdfs/07_grantees.pdf

 

Project Update: The Navajo Nation Traditional Agriculture Outreach project is currently using their CFP grant money on several projects. These projects include the development of community gardens at chapter houses located in the Western and Fort Defiance Agencies of the Navajo Nation. Another project is to work with the Greater Taos County Economic Development Center to help producers with value-added processing at commercial kitchens. The Nation Traditional Agriculture Outreach project is also working with sixty farmers to assist them with their plowing needs.

 

To learn more about the work of the Navajo Nation Traditional Agriculture Outreach project, please visit: http://nntao.org/index.html

*Update gathered from Kyril Calsoyas on 1/9/08.

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Colorado Community Food Projects:

Boulder Community Food Project (2000)

Growing Gardens

Boulder, CO

FY00 grantee funded at $120,000 for two years

 

Project Goal: To establish new partnerships among community organizations, local businesses, low-income neighborhoods, and public entities to promote a comprehensive and sustainable local food system by increasing the capacity of the community to grow and purchase food locally.

 

World Hunger Year Description: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/7

 

Project Update: The Boulder Community Food Project is a collaboration among Growing Gardens and local community partners such as Colorado State University and the housing authority to teach families in need of food to grow organic produce and prepare healthy meals. The project develops relationships with low-income neighborhoods to design and install new organic garden sites and offers gardening and nutrition education classes. Youth working with the ¡Cultiva! program built gardens at several low-income housing developments, the city homeless shelter, a senior citizen housing site, and at an elementary school, and they raise plant starts for donation to the gardeners. A master gardener conducts biweekly classes in each community, and the Food Project holds regular nutrition classes for residents of the homeless shelter.

 

For more information about Growing Gardens and the Boulder Community Food Project, please visit: http://www.growinggardens.org/english/programs/bcfp/aboutbcfp.html

*Update gathered from the World Hunger Year's Food Security Learning Center on 1/10/08.



Rural Food Box Program (2002)

Rocky Mountain Farmers' Union Cooperative Development Center

Aurora, CO

FY 2002 grantee funded at $47,900 for one year

 

Project Goal: To implement a Food Box Program that will provide for the direct delivery of boxes of fresh, local food to farmworkers and other low-income people in the rural areas of Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico. The project, though not ministry-based, would center on the involvement of Catholic parishes in the region, with middle class congregations raising funds and purchasing the food boxes for donation to the local poor, including migrant agricultural workers.

 

World Hunger Year Description: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/56

 

Project Update: The Rural Food Box Program developed two "food boxes"; one produce and one meat. The task of packing the boxes went to the staff of the Tres Rios Cooperative. The Program was able to develop a website to facilitate and expand The Rural Food Box Program box program, thanks to an additional grant.

 

Outreach to promote the program and recruit coordinators was carried out under the auspices of the Catholic Rural Life Program. Coordinators were trained using online community nutrition classes through Santa Fe Community College, with emphasis on basic nutrition, food systems and food boxes. Outreach to potential clients was done through newsletters distributes at farmers markers, the mail and food boxes.
*Update gathered from the World Hunger Year's Food Security Learning Center on 1/10/08.

 

 

National Conference of State Legislatures (2005)

Denver, CO

FY05 grantee awarded $200,000 (Oct 2005-May 2007)

 

Project Summary: The purpose of this proposal is to broaden the impact of community food projects through encouraging greater attention to state and local policy change. NCSL will accomplish this by building the capacity of CFP grantees to implement policy initiatives as part of their projects by providing policy training on topics such as food policy councils, direct marketing, and procurement policy. In recognition of the role legislators have in crafting policy, NCSL will educate them and their staff about the legislative and programmatic components in creating a sustainable community food system and enhancing access to fresh produce. This component will have the added benefit of building relationships between legislators and CFP grantees.

 

World Hunger Year Description: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/17659

 

Project Update: No update is available at this time.

 

 

Growing Partners of Southwest Colorado (2005)

Southern Ute Community Action Program

Durango, CO

FY05 grantee funded at $50,000

 

Project Summary: Growing Partners is a partnership between the Southern Ute Community Action Program, The Garden Project of Southwest Colorado, La Boca Center for Sustainability, Southwest Marketing Network, and Turtle Lake Refuge. The group is dedicated to implementing a sustainable local food program that reaches all incomes, ages and cultures. The funding was put to use to develop an assessment of local agriculture. Specifically, it will identify the current needs and resources of the local food system.

 

World Hunger Year Project Description: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21054

 

Project Update: The Growing Partners of Southwest Colorado effectively used the CFPG funding to conduct a Community Food Assessment of La Plata County. The assessment was completed in the winter of 2007. The food assessment has become the roadmap of community food projects that are taking place in the county. Growing Partners is seeking funding in 2008 from the CFPG to help fund pertinent community food projects that were identified through the food assessment.

 

For more information about the Growing Partners or to read the results of the La Plata County Community Food Assessment, please visit: http://www.growingpartners.org/who-we-are.html

*Update from Julie Hudak of The Garden Project of Southwest Colorado on 1/10/08.

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New Mexico Community Food Projects:

Los Poblanos Community Farm (2000)

Rio Grande Community Farm

Albuquerque, NM

FY00 grant recipient awarded $220,000 for three years

 

Project Summary: In partnership with the city of Albuquerque, the project will make irrigated farmland within the city available to low-income residents for the purposes of food and farming, education, and networking, policy, and public information.

 

World Hunger Year Report: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/13

 

Project Update: The Rio Grande Community Farm is currently running several projects which include; The Community Garden, Volunteer and Service Learning Programs, Workshops, The Albuquerque Food Security Network, The Annual MAIZE MAZE, Autumn Festival Harvest Markets, a Wildlife Habitat project, an Internship Program, and The Alvarado School Garden.

 

For more information about the work of the Rio Grande Community Farm, visit: http://riograndefarm.org/

*Update gathered from Los Poblanos Community Farm website on 1/10/08.



Farm to Table, Inc. (2001, 2003, 2006)

Santa Fe, NM

2001: Northern New Mexico Local Harvest Project ($182,000 for three years)

2003: Southwest Community Food and Agriculture Outpost ($190,000 for two years)

2006: Closing New Mexico's Food Gap ($65,473 for one year)

 

Project Goal: The project will strengthen the regional food system through increasing locally-grown fresh foods for consumers, providing low-income schoolchildren with nutritious meals and personal connections with food producers, and providing programs for small farmers to increase production, marketing, distribution, and delivery systems and connecting them with local markets. With all three of their Community Food Project Grants, Farm to Table aims to improve the health and sustainability of three groups: small-scale farmers; children; and low-income individuals and families.

 

World Hunger Year Report: https://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21063

 

Project Updates: 2001 Grant- The first Community Food Projects Grant that Farm to Table received had eight components. The work that was accomplished under the '01 grant included establishing Farm to School programs in 27 schools in the Santa Fe school district. During the grant cycle Farm to School programs also began in the Albuquerque and Taos school districts. Farm to Table also developed a year-round farmers' market in Santa Fe that hosted several health related events. These events included blood testing for diabetes, cooking classes and collaboration with the WIC program.

 

2003 Grant- In conjunction with the Southwest Marketing Network, a large focus of the '03-'05 CFPG was to help develop and support food policy councils in the four corners states. As a result of this work, over ten food policy councils formed between 2003 and 2005 in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico. Farm to Table worked to organize and guide the food policy councils as they began.

 

2006 Grant-: The goals of the "Closing New Mexico's Food Gap" grant were to more fully develop farm to school work in New Mexico as well as to increase the access of local foods to rural and underserved areas of New Mexico. The work completed under the grant included; conducting and completing a survey of 675 farmers throughout NM to asses the producers' interest in selling to schools (about ½ are interested), establishing EBT (electronic benefits transfer) processing at six farmers' markets, and supporting the development of Native American focused farmers' markets.

*Update gathered from Pam Roy of Farm to Table on 1/11/08.



Comida para la Vida (Food for Life) (2002, 2006)

Taos County Economic Development Corporation

Taos, N.M.

FY02: $200,000 for three years

FY06: $280,900 for three years

 

Project Goals: The project will strengthen local agriculture and provide nutrition information to low-income people, with a focus on women and children in the local WIC Program. Elements of the project include community gardening, youth involvement in agriculture, and food production, with an emphasis on traditional foods, processing of food, and development of an educational curriculum on food security. (2002)

 

To help sustain the region's agricultural lifestyle by introducing a livestock program that has the potential to rejuvenate the ranching sector, expand the role of local youth in community agriculture, and continue providing a collaborative response to local food, farm, and nutrition issues. (2006)

 

World Hunger Year Project Description: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21058

Project Update: The Taos County Economic Development Corporation is currently running community gardening and food processing programs. For more information about the Taos Community Garden and the Taos Food Center, please visit: http://www.laplaza.org/business/tcedc/activites.html

*Update gathered from the Taos County Economic Development Corporation's website on 1/10/08.



Dixon Cooperative Market (2004)

Dixon, NM

FY04 grantee, awarded $34,681

 

Project Goal: To aid in the start-up costs of a community cooperative market and commercial kitchen, located in a rural community without a grocery store that will provide a steady source of income for area farmers to sell to local customers and allow farmers and producers to make value-added prepared foods.

 

World Hunger Year Proect Descriptionj: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/20697

 

Project Update: The Dixon Cooperative Market opened in June 2005, five days a week, in an unused library outbuilding. The cooperative, which is open to everyone, opened with 125 members and grew by 50 members in its first month. A small Community Food Project matching grant provided Dixon Community Market critical start-up funding for costs such as initial rent, salaries, start-up inventory, and building repairs – although much of the work on the building was donated and volunteered by dedicated community members. Once the market becomes established in the community, board members hope to expand its services through food delivery, farm-to-school and other outreach programs.

 

For more information about the Dixon Cooperative Market, please visit: http://www.dixonmarket.com/

*Update gathered from the World Hunger Year's Food Security Learning Center on 1/10/08.



The Poeh Community Food Project (2005)

Pueblo de Pojaque

Santa Fe, NM

FY05 grant recipient, awarded $260,000

 

Project Summary: The project will emphasize whole health consciousness, collaborations, and business expertise by enhancing existing farm production and retail operations through culturally appropriate economic development, including a farmers' market, new publications, and cooking classes that promote nutrition and feature locally-grown food.

 

World Hunger Year Project Description: http://www.whyhunger.org/joinTheNetwork/orgProfile/id/21049

 

Project Update: No update is available at this time.

 

 

Comprehensive Capacity Building and Networking in Support of Community Food Projects in the Southwest (2007)

Farm to Table with the Southwest Marketing Network (SWMN)

Santa Fe, NM

Funded at $65,473 for 1 year

 

Project Summary: The project will increase the number of, effectiveness of, and connections between community food system projects in the Four Corners states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Tribal communities by building upon the existing training and networking capacity of the Southwest Marketing Network through the provision of training and technical assistance, website, annual conference, newsletter, and collaborations that provide comprehensive assistance in planning and implementing community food projects in the region. Project activities will help local groups build coalitions, develop links between low-income community members and local food systems, attract local producers and food businesses, plan effective projects well before a funding deadline looms, successfully carry out these projects. 


For more information: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/cfp/pdfs/07_grantees.pdf

 

Project Update: Resources for this assistance project are being developed at this time and are being posted on the SWMN website at www.swmarketingnetwork.org Profiles of all CFP projects in the Four Corners states, links to national assistance, and a listserv are now available.

*Update from Jim Dyer, 1/12/08



Food Promotora Program for Colonia Communities (2007)

Dona Ana County Colonias Development Council

Las Cruces, NM

Funded at $193,435 for two years

 

Project Summary: The Food and Garden Promotora Project will address food insecurity in rural areas by increasing local food production capacity through gardening and micro-enterprise opportunities. Through a promotora community-based outreach approach, the project will holistically address residents' needs in the communities of Rincón, Anthony, and Chaparral and increase access to fresh produce, raise family income, and involve youth in gardening activities.

 

For more information: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/cfp/pdfs/07_grantees.pdf

 

Project Update: Food Promotora Program for Colonia Communities is in the planning and project development phase. The organization is working to secure a land site for the youth in gardening activities. More information will be posted about this project as it evolves.